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The five tenets of clean data: Preparing chatbot data for marketing personalisation

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Organisations are already using live web chat – and increasingly chatbots – as a critical sales and customer support channel. Gartner says over 80% of companies offer some form of live chat on their website or mobile applications in order to interact with customers, and the chatbot market is likely to grow to $994 million by 2024 according to other market research. Since web chat is both 17-30% cheaper to address questions than a phone call and has the ability to increase conversion by around 20%, this explosion in growth isn’t surprising.

Because web chats and chatbot data can include rich detail about customers – product preferences, complaints or changes to their account – businesses are seeking out more advanced ways to leverage the data in these conversations. The most popular initiative is utilising the data to develop a 360 degree customer profile, which are of the basis of personalised marketing. With 41% of consumers saying they will ditch a company that doesn’t personalise their product/service effectively, bettering understanding customers is no longer just a nice-to-have.

Often the biggest barrier to leveraging web chat and chatbot data, however, is preparing it. Cleansing and preparing this unstructured data and incorporating it with structured customer information has typically required highly skilled data scientists spending enormous amounts of time to bring these diverse sources of data together. This challenge is only multiplied by the rate at which chats are generated, which, for most organisations, can reach the hundreds of thousands each month.

As marketers begin preparing this data, there are several considerations to keep in mind in order to extract the most value from it, ensure its accuracy, and utilise solutions to accelerate the notoriously time-consuming process. At Trifacta, we call these considerations our tenets of clean data. For those working with web chat or chatbot data – or any diverse data – we’ve listed them below.

Understand the context to set appropriate targets

Involving individuals with the appropriate context for the data they are working with at the preparation stage is essential to understanding how it should be transformed and what “good enough” looks like from a data quality perspective. For web chat and chatbot data, those who are closely aligned to customers and associated business objectives can better understand the nuances of it, and focus their preparation efforts and targets accordingly.

Identify issues early and often

When preparing any data – unstructured or otherwise – it’s essential to ensure that the data is consistent, complete ,current and conforms to known standards or patterns. Marketers and their team of experts should be checking every data set against these four Cs of data quality and identify any issues early, and often. Web chat and chatbot data, which is often riddled with typos or mistakes as customers type quickly, is likely to skew the results of any initiative if not remediated. It’s far more efficient to spot these issues early on in the process, rather than when an analysis isn’t delivering quality results.

Allow others across the business to collaborate and contribute additional data

In today’s customer-centric world, there are numerous departments around the business interested in mining web chat data for new insights and contributing their own data to add value to the organisation. For example, combining individual spending patterns from the finance team with positive web chat mentions around “credit cards” or negative mentions about “debt” could help financial services marketers promote certain financial products more accurately. For this kind of data sharing to happen, experts across the business should have the ability to access and transform web chat and chatbot data with data preparation solutions that encourage openness, collaboration and enable easy information sharing. Restricting access to non-PII customer data only restricts the benefits it can generate.

Once preparation is set in motion, constantly monitor

Once organisations automate data preparation workflows to transform this data, they must still continually validate the results of these workflows. They should always look to answer questions like, “is the data that showed up today what we expected? How is it different than what we have historically seen?” and “are variances meaningful?”. This is an ongoing effort that requires automation to ensure data pipelines and the resulting analysis doesn't degrade unexpectedly over time. It’s vital to keep checking back.

Ensure total transparency throughout the entire process

With increasingly strict and evolving legislation around data privacy, being able to ensure transparency throughout the data preparation process is essential. It’s not enough to communicate results; you need to show your work, whether to meet external compliance requirements, or for your own internal credibility. This is particularly important for organisations dealing with highly sensitive information like bank details that may be shared over web chat. To ensure your results are secure and can be reproduced, understood and trusted, you have to be able to audit how and when the data was transformed, as well as who transformed it.

With web chats increasingly becoming the customer service channel of choice, the value that they provide personalised marketing campaigns only continues to grow. This data can help power an organisation, but only with proper data preparation practices, as detailed in the clean data tenets.

Interested in hearing leading global brands discuss subjects like this in person?

Find out more about Digital Marketing World Forum (#DMWF) Europe, London, North America, and Singapore.

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10 questions with…. MediaLad

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In an attempt to showcase the personalities of the people behind the media and marketing sector, The Drum speaks to individuals who are bringing something a little different to the industry and talks to them about what insights and life experience they can offer the rest of us. This week's 10 Questions are put to the most anonymous of industry commentators – MediaLad

What was your first job?

Baker.

Why did you get into advertising?

I’ve always had a business or economic brain and marketing was the most attractive area for me given the psychology and quantitative aspects of it.

What’s the worst buzzword in the industry?

Transparency, leverage, gap – take your pick.

Leverage – makes it sound like you’re using someone or something to get around a problem not solve it.

Gap – basically means someone isn’t doing their job.

Transparency – no one knows what transparency actually is until they try to do it and fail miserably at it.

If you could improve Twitter – how would you go about it?

Tweetups with people near you or a gaming element to it a la HQ.

Which industry event do you have to attend every year?

The IAA Xmas ball – The biggest celebration of media in the calendar year.

What’s the most surprising thing you have learned about the ad industry since working within it?

The most surprising thing is how little the so-called knowledgeable industry experts get to grips with both sides of the buy or sell side. The fact that they don’t know that not all third-party data can be bought on premium publications (even before GDPR). The fact that some technology does not interact with others in the most fluid way, yet expect a “transparency” that just will not be there unless there is a drastic change. The fact no one even talks about that astounds me. The fact they’re so focused on the buzzwords and chasing followers or awards, and not actually fixing the problems pisses me off.

Who is the one person in advertising whose advice everyone should listen to – other than yourself?

The guys at Avocet for digital buying, namely Ezra Pierce and Simon Critchley.

Who or what did you have posters of on your wall while growing up?

Eric Cantona, and House Record Labels.

What’s the best piece of advice you’ve ever been given?

There’s a couple. From a life perspective, it’s about how much is in your control. 70% of your life is outside of your control. Stuff that happens to others in your life like your partner, parents, and loved ones. The stuff they do to annoy or delight you. 20% is what you’re in control of including life choices and what you do for fun, work, spare time etc. The rest is just pure luck and chance. For that reason only take time on the 20% as you really don’t have a lot of say on the rest.

What do you think ‘Media Lad’ means to the industry and what has being him meant to yourself?

I mean it started as a joke for the company I used to work for. I handed my notice in and had a bit of time, Twitter was new to me and I used it as a bit of a platform to promote jokes in my career that turned out to be common problems faced by everyone. It’s turned into this mad Banksy type character that (most) people enjoy, and want to unmask. I am honestly so humbled by that. Others hate it, for calling out their shit, but you know what… it’s not about who I am but it’s about what should be the “right” way to do media or your job. Bring perspective and enthusiasm to a job that really doesn’t save any lives or do anything meaningful in the world apart from raise awareness for certain companies/products. I try not to raise my own profile as (believe it or not) I’m not that type of guy that wants a headache to appear on stage. I’m busy working for my clients and that’s what motivates me.

More entries from 10 Questions With… can be found here.

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Online advertising has alienated our most valuable asset – the consumer

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It’s an understatement to say things have changed since I started my career in publishing 34 years ago, and mostly for the right reasons. The industry has moved on and some of those less palatable institutional barriers have been broken down. Yet there are certain industry behaviours that are having a real impact on original content creators, and they are so often borne from preventable consequences.

In many instances, these could be negated through the reapplication of ‘guiding principles’ that have perhaps been lost along the way.

It’s time we took a look back to make sense of what’s in front

The media industry has always been a sum of its parts, with different skills and disciplines working, mostly, in partnership. There was a sense you belonged to something special, and you knew you were directed by principles honed from many years of evolving media and advertising practices.

But it’s time to face the truth: today, consumers lack trust in digital advertising. In a quest for infinite online inventory, the crucial relationship between brand and consumer – that was built on shared values and respect – has become commoditised and jeopardised, quelling any desire for users to engage with ad campaigns. How have we got to a place where advertising that lives in the online world has all but alienated its most valuable asset – the consumer?

And no matter how many smart and inspiring examples of diversification and new monetisation models we see emerging, for original content creators, a base level of advertising remains essential.

There needs to be a change in behaviour

Many promises have been made to re-evaluate advertising practices and there’s an acknowledgement that quality and context matters. However, very little seems to have moved on and there remains limited evidence to suggest any measurable change in behaviour.

I’m not here to knock the technology that has enabled so much in modern life or the dominance of social media in which many users choose to consume news. Yet there is an obnoxious disparity around ‘standards’, accountability, and responsibility, and the right to compete fairly for advertiser funds that enable and sustain the creators of original quality journalism and content.

Despite all efforts to collaborate and support the industry’s wider call for greater parity, media owners with a long-established code of conduct and complete accountability for every single item present on their site continue to be at a disadvantage. Media organisations have always been defined by their transparent policies. So how is that an organisation like Facebook – that has such an impact and influence on the industry – is able to prosper and have a significant amount of revenue derived from online advertising, without being defined as a media business, and therefore does not need to adhere to any of the policies or codes of practice that is required by others?

As long as these organisations continue to be the principle benefactors from a type of advertising purchase behaviour, they have no motivation to change. It is only when we see a promised change in the advertisers’ behaviour, that the technology businesses themselves will be forced to re-examine their practices – meanwhile they will continue to enjoy all the spoils while residing outside of the union of all other media practitioners.

Driving better standards, and meaningful returns

As media owners, we continue to value the long-established trading partnerships centred on mutually defined policy and protocol, and relationships built on trust. These values matter.

This is a call to advertisers to check this current commodity driven behaviour, to take a moment to reflect, and work with publishers, as partners. But we also need to be sure that in striving for this goal we aren’t diluting standards, and the desire to improve accountability doesn’t just find us looking to provide a definition around practices that would otherwise be deemed as sub-standard.

Within the industry, we have in place numerous compliance guidelines. The IAB has been tireless in its efforts to bring the industry together to agree on a variety of advertising technology compliance standards. But what use are these if there is no accountability and seemingly no process to enforce compliance? While other established media channels have flight checkers in place – for both creative compliance and copy integrity – with all this wonderful technology, why does it not exist online?

And what about the extent of these standards? Premium publishers operate to much higher standards than laid out by these bodies, and always have done. They are self-regulated and they are accountable. And while I strongly support the adoption of universal standards for the good of the industry, it doesn’t change the fact they represent something that is significantly less than what we can actually provide.

At AOP, we’re committed to surfacing these challenges and we are striving to find practical answers, recommendations, and examples of best practice to help cement the future of advertising and publishing. But we must all commit to win back the trust of the consumer and return to a place of integrity – and continue to succeed as an industry I have always been proud to be part of.

Richard Reeves is managing director at AOP

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How to build brand loyalty in the age of ‘hyper personalisation’

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Consumers have more power over brands than ever before. Social media gives them the ability to openly scrutinise or share their great experiences directly with a mass audience, while online shopping means brands are in an ongoing battle to cut prices, hold user attention, deliver products quickly and ultimately stay relevant to keep consumers loyal.

Consumers also expect a lot more from brands. We’ve become accustomed to recommendations from companies like Amazon, who have changed consumer expectations by tailoring their offerings, based on previous purchases, to the extent that brands can no longer get away with ignoring online behaviours. However, often these recommendations are based on outdated algorithms and collaborative filtering.

It’s no longer enough for brands to address consumers by their first name in an email on their birthday and think that’s the personalisation box ticked. Hyper personalisation is about using data to react to consumer decisions in real-time, such as notifying them about a discount on shoes as they start their search in your app.

Businesses need to bring loyalty programmes into the digital age or risk losing the consumer base they’ve worked so hard to build.

Getting hyper personal

New data from research firm, YouGov, has found that 48% of loyalty programme subscribers are more loyal to those brands. They also found that 87% of consumers are looking for loyalty programmes that offer them discounts and offers. So why are so many brands failing at this at best – and ignoring it at worst?

The reason is simple: bad data. Traditionally, a brand would profile a consumer using a variety of factors such as age, gender, location and financial status. Take this for example: two men, both born in 1948, self-employed, wealthy, married, have dogs, own a house in London, have children and like fine wine. On paper, these two men are almost identical but in reality these two men are extremely different. This, in fact, is data pertaining to Prince Charles and Ozzy Osbourne. This highlights the main flaw with the data that brands are currently using to ‘get to know’ their audience.

So what other avenues can brands explore? Technology is evolving rapidly, so many brands may not be aware of the golden opportunity presented by advancements in AI (artificial intelligence) and computer vision analysis for mobile devices. The data on our smartphones says everything about who we are. From the places we visit to the photos we take, smartphone data provides more insight about our daily lives and habits than any other data imaginable. With consumer consent, brands can now take advantage of on-device AI, to quickly analyse that data – which includes GPS information, photo galleries, browser history and more – to build a persona for that user.

This first-party collected data is the key to the next generation of hyper-personalised consumer loyalty programmes. For one example among many, on-device AI can analyse a consumer’s entire photo gallery to produce insights about a consumer’s likes and dislikes, their desires and their intentions for the future. It also tells brands about a person’s socioeconomic status and indicates their spending power. This data is gold dust and, in the right hands, can be used to create personalised and relevant discounts and offers, benefiting both the consumer and the brand.

Imagine if you could offer a consumer what they want, need and care about, in real-time. This could be a specific discount at the moment that will be most useful, for example, discounts on home goods when they are about to relocate, or links to cheap train tickets when you know they are planning a trip. For forward-thinking brands that want their loyalty programme to stand out, this is clearly it – by showing your consumers that you really understand them.

Ultimately, this requires a shift in thinking. Brands are often rightly concerned about where the next consumer is coming from. Quarterly profit statements and shareholder scrutiny means brands need to be on the lookout for ways to improve market share. But this should not come at the expense of the existing consumer base. The potential ROI from just increasing sales to current consumers by 8% could be a significant increase in profits for many businesses. And all of this could happen overnight, by simply putting more emphasis on helping current consumers to purchase more of what they want, when they need it.

With the recent announcement that John Lewis’ profits have fallen by 99% in the first six months of 2018, the need for this shift in mindset has hit a critical juncture. Many analysts believed John Lewis to be the bastion of consumer loyalty, now they aren’t so sure. But John Lewis is already leading by example, working with Waitrose to trial combining their loyalty schemes in the hope that existing consumers don’t drift away from the brand. This is exactly the shift in mindset that is needed in today’s digital marketplace.

Metadata and understanding visual information are already the main weapons in the ongoing battle for customer attention. By leveraging offline data from smartphones and combining that with online consumer personas, on-device AI and computer vision analysis can provide brands with the ability to give consumers the experiences and recommendations that are personal, targeted and exactly what they need or desire.

It is this kind of revolutionary AI that will provide businesses with the cutting edge to differentiate themselves from the competition and offer the next generation of loyalty schemes. For anyone looking to knock John Lewis off the top of the retail tree, investing in this technology is paramount.

Interested in hearing leading global brands discuss subjects like this in person?

Find out more about Digital Marketing World Forum (#DMWF) Europe, London, North America, and Singapore.

All copyrights for this article are reserved to their respective authors.

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