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15 things you need to know about the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)

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The General Data Protection Regulation will come into action on the 25th of May 2018. This regulation is designed to strengthen data protection and privacy for both individuals and businesses within the European Union. It will have an impact on all organisations that collect data whether it be on the web or out in the real world. To make sure you are fully informed about GDPR, here is a list of 15 things that every organisation needs to know.

Greater Security Demands on Business

GDPR brings in tougher data protection regulations for all organisations that collect and process personal data.

Data Protection by Design

From the 25th May, all organisations will be required to implement reasonable data protection measures to protect EU citizen’s personal data and privacy by design. This means that end to end measures need to be planned in advance and put in place so that everything from the collection of data, all the way to it’s safe deletion is taken into account. Part of this includes the requirement for organisations to undertake a data protection impact assessment in order to accurately identify risks to data and outline measures to ensure those risks are addressed and resolved immediately.

Creating a Data Protection Officer role

Any organisation that processes or stores sensitive data or regularly monitors data subjects must create a Data Protection Officer role within their organisation. This individual will have responsibility for overseeing data protection, privacy, and GDPR compliance. All public authorities (police forces, local councils, government organisations) also must have a Data Protection Officer.

GDPR extends beyond the EU

GDPR is by default designed to protect the data and privacy of EU citizens. This means any organisation that holds data on EU citizens is required to comply with the regulation, whether they are based in the EU or not. This will have a direct impact on companies like Google, eBay & Amazon that collect web data from users in the EU. It will also effect many smaller international companies that trade in the EU, for example, app-based companies, game providers and online retailers.

GDPR will continue after Brexit

The UK has always played a leading role in protecting users and their data. The UK’s Data Protection Act was passed in 1984, 11 years before the EU got around to issuing it’s Data Protection Directive in 1995. The UK government is committed to ensuring that the rights and responsibilities encompassed in GDPR are maintained after we leave the EU.

Big Fines for Non-Compliance

The size of the fines which can be given to organisations that do not comply with GDPR is an indication of how determined the EU is to tackle issues with data protection and data privacy. From May, the maximum fine will be €20 million or 4% of an organisation’s annual global turnover, whichever is higher. This can be levied for failing to adhere to core principles of data processing, infringement of personal rights, or for transferring personal data to other countries or organisations that do not ensure an adequate level of data protection.

The issue of transferring data to countries or organisations with less adequate data protection should be a major concern for any company that has a website. If your web host has data centres outside of the EU, it is possible that the information you collect could be stored on less secure servers without your knowledge – and this could mean you are unwittingly breaching GDPR compliance. The same applies if your web host does not provide adequate security even if it is within the EU.

Range of data to be protected

Identifying data

Any information that can be used to identify an individual comes under the protection of GDPR, this includes information such as their name, address or National Insurance number as well as things like CCTV footage, car registration numbers, and RFID chip data.

Web data

GDPR also requires the safeguarding of web data. This includes details of an individual’s location, their IP addresses, and any cookie data.

Demographic information

If you collect any information that classifies individuals, this too comes under the protection of the new regulation. This includes data about gender, race, ethnicity, disability and sexual orientation.

Health, genetic and biometric data

Health, genetic and biometric data has become problematic over the last few years. Insurance companies, for example, can use this information as a basis for setting the costs of health insurance. As biometric data is increasingly used for authentication, keeping it secure is absolutely crucial. For this reason, it too is included in the data protected by GDPR.

Political affiliations

While many people aren’t too secretive about who they vote for or which political party they support, plenty of others are. If you hold data about political affiliations, whether that is their membership of a particular party or just a political opinion gathered on a survey, it needs protection under the GDPR.

GDPR gives EU citizens new rights

Under the GDPR, all EU citizens will have the following rights:

The right of access

GDPR gives EU citizens the right to know the details of any personal data you hold about them and how that data is processed and used. As an organisation, you are obliged to provide this information on request.

The right to be forgotten

People also have the right to be forgotten. This means that if a person requests it, you will be required to cease the processing of any data you hold about them and delete it.

The right to data portability

If you hold data about anyone, they can now ask for that data to be passed to another organisation. This can make things like passing on ‘no claims’ histories from one insurer to another, much easier. However, it also means that customers can use the records you hold about them to get better deals from your competitors.

The right to be informed about data breaches

Some organisations have kept serious data breaches secret for months in order to protect them from bad publicity and other unwanted consequences. Now, customers have to be legally informed within 72 hours. You must also inform any supervising bodies.

The right to data correction

Under GDPR, any data you hold about an individual must be accurate. If it isn’t, they have the right to demand it is corrected.

How can we help?

Here at Square Media, we offer an exclusive Website Security Audit to make sure that your website matches as many of the GDPR requirements as possible, as well as ensuring total security for you and your visitors. If you’d like to hear more about what we offer, don’t hesitate to get in touch with us and we’ll be happy to help!

The post 15 things you need to know about the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) appeared first on Square Media Solutions.

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Manchester United unveils official global mobile app

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Manchester United has unveiled an official mobile app powered by its digital transformation partner, HCL.

The new app features exclusive content, including the United Now feed – which collates the latest news, polls, stats, videos and blogs about the club– and a live matchday experience, including line ups, up-to-the-second match updates, live blogging, player stats and score updates from rivals.

The app will also provide exclusive content and behind-the-scenes player access.

Manchester United’s group managing director, Richard Arnold said: “This app will allow our 659 million Manchester United followers to easily connect to the club they love, wherever they are in the world. Fans will now have the opportunity to follow all Manchester United matches through the app with up-to-the-second notifications and updates.

"The app was created by a dedicated project team from HCL Technologies and Manchester United, ensuring a truly collaborative approach to the project. The team not only built the new app and website, but also created an advanced underlying platform that will give the club the ability to adapt as new technologies emerge.”

HCL Technologies’ corporate vice president, Ashish Gupta said: “Our partnership with Manchester United has been one of continuous co-innovation. HCL’s digital experience platform has driven significant business transformation combining digital product strategy and technology innovation to deliver a compelling user experience. The Manchester United official app has received excellent reviews from a worldwide fan base with downloads in over 210 markets."

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The Drum presents: Tom Ollerton talks to Rachel Falconer, head of Goldsmiths Digital Studios

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Talking about the latest marketing technology in order to make sense of it for brands and agencies to apply it through his podcast 'Shiny New Object' is Tom Ollerton, AI consultant and the former innovation director at We Are Social. In this latest installment, Rachel Falconer, head of Goldsmiths Digital Studios offers her thoughts on the impact blockchain will have on the marketing industry.

Each episode of The Shiny New Object Podcast will be distributed in partnership with The Drum and can be followed by subscribing through the Apple podcast app (which also currently features the SheSays Says series) here on the website or follow The Drum's SoundCloud page.

Tom Ollerton is a consultant in the field of creative artificial intelligence. He helps brands use the speed and scale of AI to make their content and media budgets work harder. Tom runs a monthly meetup called ‘I’ll Be Back’ that studies the intersection of creativity, ads and AI. Each week he interviews an influential marketer about their favourite new marketing technology.

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Sony Pictures Network unveils a digital campaign for the 18th Asian Games

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Sony Pictures Networks (SPN) India has unveiled the #KoiKasarNahi (No stone will be left unturned) campaign for the 18th Asian Games to be held in Indonesia.

As part of the campaign, SPN will be hosting a ‘Fan Flame’ on its microsite . Inspired by the Asian Games torch that burns in the cauldron for the duration of the Games, the virtual Fan Flame will have message of support that will be passed on to the participating Indian athletes.

To feature on the virtual Fan Flame, fans will need to use hashtag #KoiKasaNahi on social media platforms. SPN will broadcast live more than 300+ hours of the Asian Games in both Hindi and English.

It will also have a live studio show with panelists like wrestler Jagdish Kaliraman, hockey champions Sandeep Singh, Viren Rasquinha, and Jagbir Singh, tennis players Somdev Devvarman and Gaurav Natekar, badminton player Aparna Popat, and expert columnists Ayaz Memon and Boria Majumdar.

Rajesh Kaul, president, Sports and Distribution Business, Sony Pictures Networks India said: “At Sony Pictures Networks India we have always promoted a multi-sport culture and it doesn't get bigger than the 18th Asian Games.

"As our athletes compete across 36 sports and against sportspeople from 45 countries, we will bring fans and viewers the ultimate experience to enjoy the Asian Games. As patriotic fans, it’s our utmost duty to give our unrelenting support to our athletes just as they will give on this stage.”

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