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15 things you need to know about the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)

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The General Data Protection Regulation will come into action on the 25th of May 2018. This regulation is designed to strengthen data protection and privacy for both individuals and businesses within the European Union. It will have an impact on all organisations that collect data whether it be on the web or out in the real world. To make sure you are fully informed about GDPR, here is a list of 15 things that every organisation needs to know.

Greater Security Demands on Business

GDPR brings in tougher data protection regulations for all organisations that collect and process personal data.

Data Protection by Design

From the 25th May, all organisations will be required to implement reasonable data protection measures to protect EU citizen’s personal data and privacy by design. This means that end to end measures need to be planned in advance and put in place so that everything from the collection of data, all the way to it’s safe deletion is taken into account. Part of this includes the requirement for organisations to undertake a data protection impact assessment in order to accurately identify risks to data and outline measures to ensure those risks are addressed and resolved immediately.

Creating a Data Protection Officer role

Any organisation that processes or stores sensitive data or regularly monitors data subjects must create a Data Protection Officer role within their organisation. This individual will have responsibility for overseeing data protection, privacy, and GDPR compliance. All public authorities (police forces, local councils, government organisations) also must have a Data Protection Officer.

GDPR extends beyond the EU

GDPR is by default designed to protect the data and privacy of EU citizens. This means any organisation that holds data on EU citizens is required to comply with the regulation, whether they are based in the EU or not. This will have a direct impact on companies like Google, eBay & Amazon that collect web data from users in the EU. It will also effect many smaller international companies that trade in the EU, for example, app-based companies, game providers and online retailers.

GDPR will continue after Brexit

The UK has always played a leading role in protecting users and their data. The UK’s Data Protection Act was passed in 1984, 11 years before the EU got around to issuing it’s Data Protection Directive in 1995. The UK government is committed to ensuring that the rights and responsibilities encompassed in GDPR are maintained after we leave the EU.

Big Fines for Non-Compliance

The size of the fines which can be given to organisations that do not comply with GDPR is an indication of how determined the EU is to tackle issues with data protection and data privacy. From May, the maximum fine will be €20 million or 4% of an organisation’s annual global turnover, whichever is higher. This can be levied for failing to adhere to core principles of data processing, infringement of personal rights, or for transferring personal data to other countries or organisations that do not ensure an adequate level of data protection.

The issue of transferring data to countries or organisations with less adequate data protection should be a major concern for any company that has a website. If your web host has data centres outside of the EU, it is possible that the information you collect could be stored on less secure servers without your knowledge – and this could mean you are unwittingly breaching GDPR compliance. The same applies if your web host does not provide adequate security even if it is within the EU.

Range of data to be protected

Identifying data

Any information that can be used to identify an individual comes under the protection of GDPR, this includes information such as their name, address or National Insurance number as well as things like CCTV footage, car registration numbers, and RFID chip data.

Web data

GDPR also requires the safeguarding of web data. This includes details of an individual’s location, their IP addresses, and any cookie data.

Demographic information

If you collect any information that classifies individuals, this too comes under the protection of the new regulation. This includes data about gender, race, ethnicity, disability and sexual orientation.

Health, genetic and biometric data

Health, genetic and biometric data has become problematic over the last few years. Insurance companies, for example, can use this information as a basis for setting the costs of health insurance. As biometric data is increasingly used for authentication, keeping it secure is absolutely crucial. For this reason, it too is included in the data protected by GDPR.

Political affiliations

While many people aren’t too secretive about who they vote for or which political party they support, plenty of others are. If you hold data about political affiliations, whether that is their membership of a particular party or just a political opinion gathered on a survey, it needs protection under the GDPR.

GDPR gives EU citizens new rights

Under the GDPR, all EU citizens will have the following rights:

The right of access

GDPR gives EU citizens the right to know the details of any personal data you hold about them and how that data is processed and used. As an organisation, you are obliged to provide this information on request.

The right to be forgotten

People also have the right to be forgotten. This means that if a person requests it, you will be required to cease the processing of any data you hold about them and delete it.

The right to data portability

If you hold data about anyone, they can now ask for that data to be passed to another organisation. This can make things like passing on ‘no claims’ histories from one insurer to another, much easier. However, it also means that customers can use the records you hold about them to get better deals from your competitors.

The right to be informed about data breaches

Some organisations have kept serious data breaches secret for months in order to protect them from bad publicity and other unwanted consequences. Now, customers have to be legally informed within 72 hours. You must also inform any supervising bodies.

The right to data correction

Under GDPR, any data you hold about an individual must be accurate. If it isn’t, they have the right to demand it is corrected.

How can we help?

Here at Square Media, we offer an exclusive Website Security Audit to make sure that your website matches as many of the GDPR requirements as possible, as well as ensuring total security for you and your visitors. If you’d like to hear more about what we offer, don’t hesitate to get in touch with us and we’ll be happy to help!

The post 15 things you need to know about the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) appeared first on Square Media Solutions.

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Australian competition watchdog cracks down on Facebook and Google

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Google and Facebook will face greater regulation in Australia following a report by the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC).

The preliminary report by the nation’s competition watchdog raised concerns about the market power of the two media and technology giants including the companies impact on Australian businesses, particularly, their ability to monetise content. It also outlined concerns about the extent that consumers data is collected and used by companies to target advertising.

To address these concerns the report proposes a number of recommendations including a “new or existing regulatory authority be given the task of investigating, monitoring and reporting on how large digital platforms rank and display advertisements and news content”.

The report also proposes preventing Google’s Chrome browser from being installed as a default browser on mobile, tablet and computer devices. It also includes recommendations to strengthen merger laws, deal with copyright, and take-down orders, and the review of existing, disparate media regulations.

The ACCC is also considering a further recommendation for a specific code of practice for digital platforms’ data collection to better inform consumers about how platforms collect and use their information as well as changes to the Privacy Act to enable consumers to make informed decisions.

Rod Sims, chair of ACCC, said, “Digital platforms have significantly transformed our lives, the way we communicate with each other and access news and information. We appreciate that many of these changes have been positive for consumers in relation to the way they access news and information and how they interact with each other and with businesses.

“But digital platforms are also unavoidable business partners for many Australian businesses. Google and Facebook perform a critical role in enabling businesses, including online news media businesses, to reach consumers. However, the operation of these platforms’ key algorithms, in determining the order in which content appears, is not at all clear.”

Sims continued, “Organisations like Google and Facebook are more than mere distributors or pure intermediaries in the supply of news in Australia; they increasingly perform similar functions as media businesses like selecting, curating and ranking content. Yet, digital platforms face less regulation than many media businesses.

“The ACCC considers that the strong market position of digital platforms like Google and Facebook justifies a greater level of regulatory oversight.

“Australian law does not prohibit a business from possessing significant market power or using its efficiencies or skills to ‘out compete’ its rivals. But when their dominant position is at risk of creating competitive or consumer harm, governments should stay ahead of the game and act to protect consumers and businesses through regulation.”

The ACCC is currently investing five incidences of breaches to competition or consumer laws by digital platforms as a result of this inquiry.

The ACCC will take submissions regarding its recommendations with the final report to be delivered to the Government by June 2019.

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AppNexus and Microsoft's eight-year partnership: the story so far

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In the eight years since AppNexus and Microsoft formed a partnership, the programmatic landscape has evolved dramatically. Starting from when the industry was in a hypergrowth phase to considered advertising’s Wild West, where concerns around low-quality inventory, transparency, and scale were pervasive.

Even though there have been many changes in the industry since then, with AppNexus now acquired by AT&T and being part Xandr, many of those earlier concerns are still relevant.

To future-proof itself against ad fraud, Microsoft became one of the first premium publishers to test the programmatic waters eight years ago, when it says it committed to stringent quality and brand safety standards, working with AppNexus to apply quality control and transparency policies.

AppNexus also developed an audit process that became the template for how Microsoft evaluated every advertiser on the Microsoft Advertising Exchange (MAX), in order to set high brand safety standards. In 2017, Microsoft became the first publisher to join AppNexus’ transparent auctions initiative, which is a visible communication that tells buyers what kind of auction they are entering as the bid request is sent.

By informing advertisers on whether they are participating in a first- or second-price auction and alerting them to the price floor, this innovation allowed buyers to better understand how their bid prices influenced their win-rate and clearing price.

After AppNexus enforced ads.txt and made a commitment to proactively audits its partners to ensure that it works with clients who share its commitment to quality standards, Microsoft was also quick to implement ads.txt on MSN and part of Windows and is in the process of rolling it out globally.

Today, Microsoft delivers more than 700 billion impressions annually in the AppNexus ecosystem, across display, video, and mobile channels. By focusing on the user experience and setting up their pages to render ads in-view, Microsoft’s publisher brands has a viewable inventory rate of over 85% according to AppNexus’ viewability analysis, which is well above the industry average.

Tae Kyu Kim, the senior regional director at AppNexus, tells The Drum as programmatic continues to become a standard way of media buying, the industry has finally caught up to the vision that Microsoft and AppNexus outlined from the start, which is quality at scale no matter what method you use to buy media.

“From a technology perspective, Microsoft and AppNexus partnered early on to improve viewability and increase quality and transparency. Over the last year or so, we have really seen our vision be validated and affirmed by a demand for these qualities and capabilities across the buying landscape,” he explains.

“From an integration perspective, the complexity of the ecosystem means a lot of development work to ensure integration. The key is identifying opportunities and integrations that optimize and bring efficiency to your programmatic strategy, rather than complicate it.”

Giving an example of how MAX has worked with clients over the years, Tae shares how an airline that wanted to generate click-through rates (CTR) to their website in Taiwan and chose to run an MSN Home Page Takeover (HPTO). The result was a 0.42% CTR.

For another advertiser that wanted full control of guaranteed impressions, even delivery, time targeting, MAX proposed a large format priority deal (PMP) on MSN. “The buyer experienced a significant average CTR of 0.98% with their deal for a custom header, which resulted in them increasing their budget to the campaign,” says Tae.

Increasingly, supply chain inefficiencies have become a big topic for brands who are concern about the money they are spending and wasting. Tae acknowledges this an unfortunate by-product of programmatic’s rising popularity is that it has made the entire ecosystem more complex.

He points out that removing supply chain inefficiencies is why Microsoft chose AppNexus as its exclusive SSP and why Microsoft is supportive of initiatives that built trust with buyers by giving them visibility into their spend on the AppNexus platform.

“It’s early days, but I’m pleased to say that as of September 2018, Microsoft finalized testing around transparent fees,” explains Tae. “All Microsoft app and display publishers transparently will expose fees to buyers that are using transparency partners (like Amino Payments) to track payments through the supply chain.”

Together with Microsoft, the road ahead for AppNexus will be driving the understanding of the critical importance of transparency, openness, and quality to the programmatic industry. While it continues to innovate its technology through new formats and offerings, it wants to simultaneously partner with Microsoft on initiatives that build trust in the marketplace and supply chain.

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10 questions with…. MediaLad

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In an attempt to showcase the personalities of the people behind the media and marketing sector, The Drum speaks to individuals who are bringing something a little different to the industry and talks to them about what insights and life experience they can offer the rest of us. This week's 10 Questions are put to the most anonymous of industry commentators – MediaLad

What was your first job?

Baker.

Why did you get into advertising?

I’ve always had a business or economic brain and marketing was the most attractive area for me given the psychology and quantitative aspects of it.

What’s the worst buzzword in the industry?

Transparency, leverage, gap – take your pick.

Leverage – makes it sound like you’re using someone or something to get around a problem not solve it.

Gap – basically means someone isn’t doing their job.

Transparency – no one knows what transparency actually is until they try to do it and fail miserably at it.

If you could improve Twitter – how would you go about it?

Tweetups with people near you or a gaming element to it a la HQ.

Which industry event do you have to attend every year?

The IAA Xmas ball – The biggest celebration of media in the calendar year.

What’s the most surprising thing you have learned about the ad industry since working within it?

The most surprising thing is how little the so-called knowledgeable industry experts get to grips with both sides of the buy or sell side. The fact that they don’t know that not all third-party data can be bought on premium publications (even before GDPR). The fact that some technology does not interact with others in the most fluid way, yet expect a “transparency” that just will not be there unless there is a drastic change. The fact no one even talks about that astounds me. The fact they’re so focused on the buzzwords and chasing followers or awards, and not actually fixing the problems pisses me off.

Who is the one person in advertising whose advice everyone should listen to – other than yourself?

The guys at Avocet for digital buying, namely Ezra Pierce and Simon Critchley.

Who or what did you have posters of on your wall while growing up?

Eric Cantona, and House Record Labels.

What’s the best piece of advice you’ve ever been given?

There’s a couple. From a life perspective, it’s about how much is in your control. 70% of your life is outside of your control. Stuff that happens to others in your life like your partner, parents, and loved ones. The stuff they do to annoy or delight you. 20% is what you’re in control of including life choices and what you do for fun, work, spare time etc. The rest is just pure luck and chance. For that reason only take time on the 20% as you really don’t have a lot of say on the rest.

What do you think ‘Media Lad’ means to the industry and what has being him meant to yourself?

I mean it started as a joke for the company I used to work for. I handed my notice in and had a bit of time, Twitter was new to me and I used it as a bit of a platform to promote jokes in my career that turned out to be common problems faced by everyone. It’s turned into this mad Banksy type character that (most) people enjoy, and want to unmask. I am honestly so humbled by that. Others hate it, for calling out their shit, but you know what… it’s not about who I am but it’s about what should be the “right” way to do media or your job. Bring perspective and enthusiasm to a job that really doesn’t save any lives or do anything meaningful in the world apart from raise awareness for certain companies/products. I try not to raise my own profile as (believe it or not) I’m not that type of guy that wants a headache to appear on stage. I’m busy working for my clients and that’s what motivates me.

More entries from 10 Questions With… can be found here.

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