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SMX Advanced 2018 Session Recap: Maximizing the Impact of Online Video Ads

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Because I am a huge fan of video advertising, I have a hard time understanding why video marketing is so underutilized by many companies.

I attended the Maximizing the Impact of Online Video Ads session at SMX Advanced and came away with a lot of information that will change that. Hopefully, after reading this, you’ll be inspired to start using video to promote your brand.

Bryant Garvin, Purple

Bryant attributes his company’s rapid success to its successful video campaigns. Purple (his company) has over 1 billion video views. How do they do it? With emotion and education. Video is an emotional format, and consumers buy on emotion.

According to a study at Stanford (source in the slides below), stories are remembered 22 times more than facts alone, and purchases are always emotional decisions. Humans are hard-wired to pay attention to stories, so stories are the catalyst to connect with potential customers emotionally.

As consumers, we decide to transact before we emotionally decide on it. You really have two seconds to capture someone’s attention instead of the 5.7-second average view time Facebook mentions. That being said, video marketers need to test the intro first.

Bryant’s company tested three intros to the same video. All they did was make minor changes to each one. What were the results? They saw a 2,824.7 percent brand keyword search lift after testing out a different, branded video. No matter how well you think your videos are doing, keep in mind that even the best videos can be improved.

Still not convinced YouTube is amazing? Let me toss out some more stats Bryant called out:

  • Over 1.5 billion Users on YouTube.
  • One billion hours are watched daily.
  • 68 percent of people use YouTube to help make purchase decisions.
  • 80 percent of 18-49-year-olds watch YouTube in a given month.
  • Only 9 percent of United States small businesses are using YouTube.
  • You only pay after 30 seconds are viewed or the video is completed.

You want to be where your competitors are not, and YouTube offers targeting options which will help you drive purchase intent. Google’s audience solutions, such as Life Events and Custom Intent Audiences, are great for reaching the right people.

When combined with a powerful video that provided the emotional connection, Purple’s message had the one-two punch that lowered their cost-per-visit and greatly increased the uplift in brand searches.

Videos don’t have to have a sales tone and vibe. Keep in mind that emotions sell and prompt purchases.

Cory Henke, Variable Media Agency

Cory started by saying, in 2018, that the power of video is attention. In the age of high-speed internet and mobile devices, we’ve all become multitaskers and storytellers. Users have so many choices as to how and where to consume online. The problem with video is that it cannot be scaled, and it’s hard to keep a user’s attention.

With Facebook, we don’t know why the user came to the site. Was it to watch a video or read Grandma’s post? It’s hard to predict what a user is going to do on Facebook.

Now think about YouTube. Most people go to YouTube just to watch a video. They don’t read or write comments anywhere near as much as they view videos. This focused action is why advertisers need to build videos for the platform.

YouTube TrueView has become the most valuable impression on the web. Why? Cory emphasized exactly what Bryant mentioned in his presentation. Advertisers don’t pay a cent for any video views from zero to 30 seconds long. Cory then asked the audience to name one other channel where you can get consistent, free advertising. The silence in the crowd proved his point.

With TrueView, users have the option to skip your ad after 5 seconds. We must create content to meet our strategic goals, which are keeping the user’s attention, by doing the following:

  • Grab attention with a hook immediately in the first few seconds.
  • Engage the users and make sure to illustrate a problem those users can relate to.
  • Establish your brand and qualify users to prove why your company/product/service is the right choice.
  • Then re-hook your audience to drive action.

More engagements equal lower cost-per-view (CPV) if you get those users past 30 seconds.

People consume video differently on YouTube versus television. TV is a passive viewing environment, while YouTube is an active viewing environment. With this mindset, we’ve seen the forced 30-, 60- and 90-second ads get de-prioritized. Skippable video and 6-second bumpers are now the preferred choice for users because they have more control over which videos they prefer to watch.

With video, there are primarily two types of users: lean-back and lean-forward.

  • Lean-back users are YouTube, TV and Netflix. All three embrace the longer video format. They’re more likely to watch an entire video ad and less likely to last-click convert. We should be reaching these users with emotional and storytelling video content.
  • Lean-forward users are Facebook, Instagram and Snapchat. These three have shorter watch times, but they are more expensive. We should be using quick reminders and savvy call-to-action videos to be mid- to lower-funnel-oriented.

We’ve gone from the age of one 30-minute show to 30 one-minute shows. The shift in user behavior leads to a shift in our content. Take advantage of all the creative and targeting options you have to keep your users’ attention.

Allen Martinez, Noble Digital

Allen asked the audience a question:

Which one of these three things account for 80% of a campaign’s success? The right message, the right time, or the right place?

The answer is the right message. According to Andrew Robertson of BBDO Worldwide, the right creative accounts for 80 percent of the customer’s return path. Get the story right first, and then focus on timing and placements.

Think about what Facebook is doing now in regard to ad testing. Advertisers now have the option to variable test the ad creative. Facebook purposely puts “creative” as the first option for us to test because they understand it’s the most important.

If you are still asking why you should use video, the answer is because it’s the one medium that contains multiple other mediums. We have storylines, branding, performances, emotion, music, mood, production design, art, visual effects and so much more. The problem is that in most companies, the strategy is commonly separated from creativity.

Brian Chesky of Airbnb said:

The designing of an experience uses a different part your brain than the scaling of that experience.

First, you build the experience with your creative team. And then you scale with your strategy team.

Allen then presented a case study from the meal kit company Plated and showed how Plated revamped their original video after reviewing data and surveys and listening to their audience. The creative goal was to make the feel of the video less ad-like and more personal, like users were watching themselves in the video. Changing their video helped Plated become more successful.

Don’t wait for intent, create it. Search is like an online Black Friday every day. Most search results are going to have search and shopping ads ready to sell. People are more curious and open than we think. What you tell a user early on in the funnel will always be more important than how you are trying to sell them at the bottom of the funnel. Use creative video to help win the deal early.

Want to learn more? Join us in October our SMX East “Obsessed With SEO & SEM” conference in New York City, where top industry experts will share their tips, tactics and strategies around SEO and SEM topics.

The post SMX Advanced 2018 Session Recap: Maximizing the Impact of Online Video Ads appeared first on Marketing Land.

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Most marketers claim creativity ‘harmed by digital advertising growth’

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Most marketers claim creativity ‘harmed by digital advertising growth’

Marketers face a challenge as they try to balance technology innovation with creativity, with digital growth in advertising coming at the expense of the quality of creative, according to a new survey.

The study, from Sizmek, surveyed more than 500 business decision making brand-marketers across Europe and the US, found that over two thirds (67%) believe digital growth in advertising has come at the expense of the quality of creative.

When looking at the impact of AI, 84% understand that it is entirely useless without the right creative input to support it.

The post Most marketers claim creativity ‘harmed by digital advertising growth’ appeared first on Netimperative – latest digital marketing news.

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10 questions with… Carter Murray, chief executive of FCB

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The Drum speaks to people across the global media and marketing sector who are bringing something a little different to the industry and talks to them about what little insights they can offer the rest of us. This week's 10 Questions are answered by FCB chief executive, Carter Murray.

What was your first ever job?

My first ever job was cleaning boats. My first proper, steady job, however, was as an assistant account executive at Leo Burnett Chicago.

Which industry buzzword annoys you most?

“Guru” (as in “marketing guru”). Most people called gurus actually are not. And this misnomer often causes havoc within client organizations and the creative process more generally.

Who would you most love to share a coffee with?

My mother and father. I lost them both two years ago, within six months of each other, and still miss them terribly.

Highlight of your career (so far?)

The first was getting to work with Harry MacAuslan, THE gentleman of advertising (now retired) and the second was persuading Susan Credle to come to FCB and be my creative partner.

What piece of tech can you not live without?

Sadly (and my wife will very much attest to this) – it's my bloody telephone.

What is (in your opinion) the greatest film/album/book of your life?

Power of One, by Bryce Courtenay. I read it when I was thirteen and it absolutely got to me. I loved the boxing, wildlife, Africa and personal narratives, but most of all, the constant reminder to “think first with your head and then with your heart.”

What one question do you never want anyone to ask you?

Why are you so obsessed with dim sum?

Best advice you ever heard or received?

Shut up and listen.

What do you still want to achieve in your career?

Balance.

What industry event is most important to you to attend and why?

Cannes. It saves me multiple trips around the world, as everyone is centralized there, and I get to talk about our industry with some of the most groundbreaking work all around us, to inspire and push us to always do better. It’s always long and busy work hours, but it all happens in a ridiculously civilized setting.

Check out other interviews as part of the 10 Questions With… series.

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‘Bang for our buck’: how MSIG's first-ever CMO plans to reinvent insurance marketing

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As the first-ever person to hold the chief marketing officer role at MSIG Holdings (Asia), Rebecca Ang Lee believes her most immediate priorities is to ensure alignment of the insurer in the online space, develop a regional sustainability direction, and promote digital transformation through innovation within the company and industry to stay relevant.

MSIG, which is a part of the Mitsui Sumitomo Insurance Company within the MS&AD Insurance Group, promoted Lee, who oversaw brand and communications and business excellence across ASEAN, Hong Kong, Australia, and New Zealand as senior vice-president, in October.

Lee has wasted no time in getting down to work, ensuring that MSIG customers can expect dynamic websites with better user experience across its markets in the region. MSIG Vietnam was the first to complete the revamp early this year, with Lee pushing for more markets to complete their respective websites in the next couple of months.

“The new website was built with the users’ experience in mind and I am looking forward to getting our customers’ feedback. Content on our social media channels are also progressively evolving to better serve our customers,” she explains. “A success story to quote is MSIG Indonesia – we started out with less than 1k followers and achieved a substantial leap to about 90k today just after a year of introducing refreshed content.”

“We hope to replicate this success in the other markets, taking local preferences and nuances into consideration. Ultimately, our goal is to engage our customers with useful content that can aid them in their insurance purchase journey.”

MSIG’s sustainability agenda is now managed by the brand and communications team, which is led by Lee, after the creation of the sustainability taskforce for Asia. She explains this means she can embed the key messages into the group’s internal and external communications, therefore strengthening its brand building efforts.

“The goal is to ensure MSIG’s medium-term management plan ‘Vision 2021’, which emphasizes sustainability as a key focus for the group, is carried on. “With the creation of the sustainability taskforce for Asia, we hope to complement our group’s initiatives and achieve greater impact together,” she says.

“As sustainability is becoming an issue of growing importance around the region, and in the world, we have a responsibility to support this agenda. We will need to build a sustainability mindset and culture from within the organization, and are looking to collaborate with partners to engage and educate all staff.”

Lee is also trying to promote innovation within the company and industry through partnerships to catch up with its rivals like NTUC Income, which ranked the highest in Singapore when it comes to being future ready for digital transformation, while MSIG came in 22nd. It has since signed a deal with start-up accelerator Plug and Play which will see it become a founding anchor partner of Plug and Play’s Insurtech platform.

The platform aims to invest in and help local and international fintech and Insurtech startups to grow through connecting them to major financial institutions and insurers. It will also allow MSIG to build relationships with start-ups that are developing new technologies and solutions.

According to Lee, this partnership will help MSIG innovate and explore revolutionary ideas as technology is changing at a pace where it is forcing the industry to undergo digital transformation especially in the more mature markets such as Hong Kong and Singapore.

“From the angle of internal communications, we explored different ways to engage our employees, creating thematic town halls that infuse the creative use of digital apps and tools to create a mindset change from within,” she says.
“The pace of technology also impacts the media channels and landscape. Digital no longer just means website and social media channels. While people are consuming news through social media, they are also getting their entertainment from Netflix, using more smart devices and creating smart homes to manage their lifestyle. This means that consumer digital touchpoints are increasing with new channels to reach out to them. However, budgets are always limited, and the challenge is deciding where to place them to reach out to our desired target audience.”

MSIG's marketing strategy and its relationship with its agencies

With limited budgets and facing the challenges of reaching out to its desired target audience even as they get more connected than ever before and expect seamless experiences when they interact with brands, MSIG wants to focus on its unique selling points of providing great service quality and offering a seamless claims experience for its customers.

Lee, who spent more than two years in total working at agencies like Leo Burnett, Dentsu and Y&R before joining MSIG, is keen to tap on her experience as a communicator and a leader having been on both sides of the fence, to ensure MSIG’s marketing strategy over the long term is relevant and that the company will continuously innovate to improve customer experience.

For example, in Singapore, she points out MSIG was the first to introduce straight-through claims payout using FAST bank transfer, eliminating the time to process cheques and in Thailand, it introduced MSIG SpeeDi, where motor insurance customers are able to get phone assistance within 60 seconds with the touch of a button, have their location triangulated by GPS and sent to a motor surveyor who will arrive on scene within 30 minutes. For Malaysia, MSIG optimized its processes to save claims processing time by over 98% so that customers can get their payment quickly.

“It’s about putting ourselves in our customers’ shoes and challenging the status quo. We have a few customer segments depending on the insurance need, and we target them through consumer insights, behavior and content marketing both offline and online,” she explains.

“The advantage of using online channels is that we’re able to measure our KPIs. However, it does not just stop there, the data needs to be analyzed with follow up action plans to improve on future communication and targeting of our products to customers.”

Lee is also keen to stress MSIG’s marketing strategy cannot succeed if it is not open and honest with its agencies, the key to forging a successful partnership, as they will help them understand the company’s challenges. MSIG’s creative agency is M&C Saatchi and its media agency is Wavemaker.

In addition, she also sees agencies as an extension of her own team and will take time to share information and insights in MSIG’s discussions with its agencies.

“When I joined MSIG two years ago, our branding efforts were only beginning. We were looking for partners who understood our starting point and were keen to grow with us. Two years on, we see both agencies as partners in this journey of brand building, supporting us in our vision to develop MSIG Asia as the centre of excellence,” Lee explains.

Cutting through the noise

Presently, the insurance industry is a saturated one with both life and general insurers vying for a share of voice. It also does not help when there is little differentiation between life and general insurance brands in the eyes of a consumer.

Moving forward, Lee says MSIG approach is to get a ‘bang for our buck’, to be more strategic and creative in its messaging, positioning and targeting. Digital is always a part of MSIG’s media mix as it enables the insurer to target its customers better and is a more cost-effective channel.

“However, we still try to adopt a holistic approach as our research has shown that a combination of traditional and digital media still works best for us to achieve high awareness for a campaign. Also, apart from advertising, it is important to integrate all other customer touch points in the entire buying cycle, from discovery to purchase to repeat customers,” she explains.

“It’s about the synergies of messaging through 360 marketing including in-store experience, PR and research. Pre- and post-campaign research is crucial in understanding the most effective media channel and the research results are always used to improve the media mix for the next campaign.”

There are daunting tasks facing Lee as she tries to future poof MSIG for the future, but moving Lee into the newly-created CMO role is the first step by the insurer to getting there.

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