Connect with us

Advertising

SMX Advanced 2018 Session Recap: Maximizing the Impact of Online Video Ads

Published

on

Because I am a huge fan of video advertising, I have a hard time understanding why video marketing is so underutilized by many companies.

I attended the Maximizing the Impact of Online Video Ads session at SMX Advanced and came away with a lot of information that will change that. Hopefully, after reading this, you’ll be inspired to start using video to promote your brand.

Bryant Garvin, Purple

Bryant attributes his company’s rapid success to its successful video campaigns. Purple (his company) has over 1 billion video views. How do they do it? With emotion and education. Video is an emotional format, and consumers buy on emotion.

According to a study at Stanford (source in the slides below), stories are remembered 22 times more than facts alone, and purchases are always emotional decisions. Humans are hard-wired to pay attention to stories, so stories are the catalyst to connect with potential customers emotionally.

As consumers, we decide to transact before we emotionally decide on it. You really have two seconds to capture someone’s attention instead of the 5.7-second average view time Facebook mentions. That being said, video marketers need to test the intro first.

Bryant’s company tested three intros to the same video. All they did was make minor changes to each one. What were the results? They saw a 2,824.7 percent brand keyword search lift after testing out a different, branded video. No matter how well you think your videos are doing, keep in mind that even the best videos can be improved.

Still not convinced YouTube is amazing? Let me toss out some more stats Bryant called out:

  • Over 1.5 billion Users on YouTube.
  • One billion hours are watched daily.
  • 68 percent of people use YouTube to help make purchase decisions.
  • 80 percent of 18-49-year-olds watch YouTube in a given month.
  • Only 9 percent of United States small businesses are using YouTube.
  • You only pay after 30 seconds are viewed or the video is completed.

You want to be where your competitors are not, and YouTube offers targeting options which will help you drive purchase intent. Google’s audience solutions, such as Life Events and Custom Intent Audiences, are great for reaching the right people.

When combined with a powerful video that provided the emotional connection, Purple’s message had the one-two punch that lowered their cost-per-visit and greatly increased the uplift in brand searches.

Videos don’t have to have a sales tone and vibe. Keep in mind that emotions sell and prompt purchases.

Cory Henke, Variable Media Agency

Cory started by saying, in 2018, that the power of video is attention. In the age of high-speed internet and mobile devices, we’ve all become multitaskers and storytellers. Users have so many choices as to how and where to consume online. The problem with video is that it cannot be scaled, and it’s hard to keep a user’s attention.

With Facebook, we don’t know why the user came to the site. Was it to watch a video or read Grandma’s post? It’s hard to predict what a user is going to do on Facebook.

Now think about YouTube. Most people go to YouTube just to watch a video. They don’t read or write comments anywhere near as much as they view videos. This focused action is why advertisers need to build videos for the platform.

YouTube TrueView has become the most valuable impression on the web. Why? Cory emphasized exactly what Bryant mentioned in his presentation. Advertisers don’t pay a cent for any video views from zero to 30 seconds long. Cory then asked the audience to name one other channel where you can get consistent, free advertising. The silence in the crowd proved his point.

With TrueView, users have the option to skip your ad after 5 seconds. We must create content to meet our strategic goals, which are keeping the user’s attention, by doing the following:

  • Grab attention with a hook immediately in the first few seconds.
  • Engage the users and make sure to illustrate a problem those users can relate to.
  • Establish your brand and qualify users to prove why your company/product/service is the right choice.
  • Then re-hook your audience to drive action.

More engagements equal lower cost-per-view (CPV) if you get those users past 30 seconds.

People consume video differently on YouTube versus television. TV is a passive viewing environment, while YouTube is an active viewing environment. With this mindset, we’ve seen the forced 30-, 60- and 90-second ads get de-prioritized. Skippable video and 6-second bumpers are now the preferred choice for users because they have more control over which videos they prefer to watch.

With video, there are primarily two types of users: lean-back and lean-forward.

  • Lean-back users are YouTube, TV and Netflix. All three embrace the longer video format. They’re more likely to watch an entire video ad and less likely to last-click convert. We should be reaching these users with emotional and storytelling video content.
  • Lean-forward users are Facebook, Instagram and Snapchat. These three have shorter watch times, but they are more expensive. We should be using quick reminders and savvy call-to-action videos to be mid- to lower-funnel-oriented.

We’ve gone from the age of one 30-minute show to 30 one-minute shows. The shift in user behavior leads to a shift in our content. Take advantage of all the creative and targeting options you have to keep your users’ attention.

Allen Martinez, Noble Digital

Allen asked the audience a question:

Which one of these three things account for 80% of a campaign’s success? The right message, the right time, or the right place?

The answer is the right message. According to Andrew Robertson of BBDO Worldwide, the right creative accounts for 80 percent of the customer’s return path. Get the story right first, and then focus on timing and placements.

Think about what Facebook is doing now in regard to ad testing. Advertisers now have the option to variable test the ad creative. Facebook purposely puts “creative” as the first option for us to test because they understand it’s the most important.

If you are still asking why you should use video, the answer is because it’s the one medium that contains multiple other mediums. We have storylines, branding, performances, emotion, music, mood, production design, art, visual effects and so much more. The problem is that in most companies, the strategy is commonly separated from creativity.

Brian Chesky of Airbnb said:

The designing of an experience uses a different part your brain than the scaling of that experience.

First, you build the experience with your creative team. And then you scale with your strategy team.

Allen then presented a case study from the meal kit company Plated and showed how Plated revamped their original video after reviewing data and surveys and listening to their audience. The creative goal was to make the feel of the video less ad-like and more personal, like users were watching themselves in the video. Changing their video helped Plated become more successful.

Don’t wait for intent, create it. Search is like an online Black Friday every day. Most search results are going to have search and shopping ads ready to sell. People are more curious and open than we think. What you tell a user early on in the funnel will always be more important than how you are trying to sell them at the bottom of the funnel. Use creative video to help win the deal early.

Want to learn more? Join us in October our SMX East “Obsessed With SEO & SEM” conference in New York City, where top industry experts will share their tips, tactics and strategies around SEO and SEM topics.

The post SMX Advanced 2018 Session Recap: Maximizing the Impact of Online Video Ads appeared first on Marketing Land.

All copyrights for this article are reserved to their respective authors.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Comments

Advertising

Marketing Day: Pinterest opens API, Shopify unveils new tools, SMXperts & more

Published

on

Here’s our recap of what happened in online marketing today, as reported on Marketing Land and other places across the web.

From Marketing Land:

Recent Headlines From MarTech Today, Our Sister Site Dedicated To Marketing Technology:

Online Marketing News From Around The Web:

The post Marketing Day: Pinterest opens API, Shopify unveils new tools, SMXperts & more appeared first on Marketing Land.

All copyrights for this article are reserved to their respective authors.

Continue Reading

Advertising

US Creative Work of the Week: Lee Jeans combats manspreading and kimono trapping

Published

on

Lee Jeans puts the mobility of its denim on full display in its 'Don’t just move. Move your Lee.' Campaign, created by Austin-based agency of record, GSD&M.

The campaign includes three TV spots that speak to modern consumers, with hip, young subjects in everyday, topical (and sometimes impractical) situations.

In one, a woman on the subway combats a guy who is clearly encroaching onto her seat by ‘manspreading.’ She one-ups him by hoisting her jean-clad leg over his so he gets the point. Another finds a woman who has her kimono caught in a taxi door chasing the cab down the street to get her garment free. A third finds a dog walker leaping and flipping acrobatically to untangle many leashes.

The campaign is meant to remind customers that Lee is the perfect jean for everyday movements for all demographics – equate with the new messaging that Lee Jeans are not only stylish, but freedom-inducing products that helps consumers move forward, accomplish, and progress.

For its confident swagger and pointed sales objective, The Drum’s readers voted the campaign the US Creative Work of the Week.

See the campaign by clicking on the Creative Works box below.

To vote for next week’s US Creative Work of the Week, visit our latest US Creative Works here. To keep up to date with all the advertising, design and creative projects from around the globe, visit our Creative Works homepage.

: 'Lee Jeans – Don’t just move. Move your Lee.'

Agency:
Client:
Date: September 2018

Popular denim brand Lee Jeans has launched a new campaign, 'Don’t just move. Move your Lee.' Created by Austin-based AOR, GSD&M, the campaign includes three TV spots that speak to the modern consumer, with hip, young subjects in everyday, topical (and sometimes impractical) situations, in which acrobatic feats are made possible thanks to the movement and comfort of their Lee jeans. From tackling 'manspreading' as a female subway rider, to dashing after a kimono trapped in a taxi door, Lee Jeans were made to move with purpose, while also providing effortless style and confidence to help you be you.
The campaign is meant to remind customers that Lee is the perfect jean for everyday movements for all demographics – equate with the new messaging that Lee Jeans are not only stylish, but freedom-inducing products that helps consumers move forward, accomplish, and progress.
The campaign will run nationally on broadcast through October, and will be accompanied with paid and organic social content on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Snapchat, and Pinterest.

Credits:

Client: Lee Jeans
Agency: GSD&M
Creative Directors: Maria D’Amato, Jeffrey Butterworth
Writer: Addie Williams
Art Director: Hannah Dobbs
Producer: Alison Wagner
Account: Shawn Mackoff, Lauren Paver, Jane Conyngham
Social Media: Bailey Brown, Jessica Lee
Media: Evan Walker
Project Management: Christie Shepard

Tags: United States

Video of Spread | Lee Jeans Commercial

Video of Strut | Lee Jeans Commercial

Video of Stroll | Lee Jeans Commercial

Loading…
All copyrights for this article are reserved to their respective authors.

Continue Reading

Advertising

5 ways to leverage real third-party purchase intent

Published

on

A combination of genius and incredible access to capital has enabled Amazon to become a retail operation truly inconceivable just a decade or so ago.

Untethered from the constraints of physical location, Amazon has made it possible for many of us to rarely visit a retail operation for more than a tank of gas or a cup of coffee. And by consolidating a larger and larger percentage of our shopping and consumption behaviors, there’s less and less that Amazon doesn’t know about us or that they couldn’t easily figure out if they wanted to.

While we can certainly argue about whether the end game is to everyone’s benefit as a society, B2C marketers know that, in the near term, it behooves them to accept reality and try to play along in Amazon’s game.

As I think about lining up catalog operations, department stores, big-box retailers, suburban malls and Amazon along an evolutionary timeline, it’s the similarities that jump out at me more than the differences. It’s the strength of each concept taken singly and together that B2B sellers should all try to take advantage of.

1. Go where the buyers go

In B2B, you don’t need to dive into the many years of academic research to decide where to place your storefront, you know you’ve got to be on the web.

But being open for inbound business alone simply isn’t enough. Retailers use data about pedestrian and car traffic patterns to site their next store. B2C brands know they have to be on Amazon.

Every B2B seller owes it to themselves to find out where buyer traffic already congregates. You need to know where your total available market (TAM) goes when it’s in a buyer’s journey, and you need to be there, too.

Surf on Google’s gravity. While it’s not yet Amazon for B2B, for us, Google exerts much the same sort of “internet gravity” on our buyers. When a buyer begins their journey, they go to Google and ramp up search behaviors, which is why you can and should use SEO and paid search to be prominent on Google.

At the same time, however, you should also study who is consistently ranking high in and around relevant topics and see if there’s a way for you to do the same. Look for high-ranking third-party properties that will let you add your content and offerings. Then build your campaigns to link and bend their audience back to you.

Make sure to advertise to buyers instead of surfers. Although there’s plenty of browsing that happens on Amazon, and advertisers there may well be able to stimulate impulse buys, B2B buying behaviors are very different, as are the outlets that support them.

In B2B, we all spend plenty of time on the web reading about things that matter to us without ever demonstrating what could be recognized as real purchase intent. It would be easy to spend your entire advertising budget targeting demographics or on sites that have no contextual relevance to what someone in a buyer’s journey is actually looking for. Make sure the outlets you narrow your investigation to can show how their content supports the buying research efforts of the people you need to add to your funnel.

2. Bring the buyers to you

I think we can all agree we still aren’t where we need to be with advertising retargeting. When I’m shopping on Amazon, I’m definitely not in the market for my next piece of martech stackware.

Context continues to be a stumbling block for many B2B advertisers. But thinking about exactly what you’re trying to accomplish goes a long way toward landing on better a strategy. To drive maximum ROI, you need to raise consideration for your solution among the companies that are in a deal cycle.

On Amazon, you’d want to promote your offering whenever someone was shopping for products like yours. Real third-party purchase intent can put you in exactly the context you need to bring buyers to your store. By advertising in and around editorial content designed to support purchase decisions, it becomes natural for your desired audience to pay attention to your message and click through to your website.

3. Know what real buyers want

Once you’ve narrowed your advertising focus down to the optimum number of outlets, you need to access a significant volume of real buyers in your specific market category. Then you’ll need to make sure to get everything necessary to convert those people into prospects. This can be harder than it sounds.

Even though a lot of advertising suppliers can now help target specific companies somewhat accurately, outside of activity within your own program, very few of them can tell you very much about what’s working with your audience and what isn’t.

This is exactly the kind of information Amazon withheld from sellers until recently. Here’s another area where the best third-party purchase intent provider can help out. They should be able to show not only your own effectiveness but also what else is attracting your target audience’s attention, be it editorial or promotional material.

To improve your own performance, you’ll want to study this closely and modify your material as necessary to address what buyers are actually looking for.

4. See what real buying groups do

Even though we understand how buying groups actually behave, too many organizations are still relying on a kind of jury-rigged approach to pursuing demand inside of accounts.

First, they find accounts they think might be active. If they get any clicks on ads or inbound web traffic, they then assign sales development reps (SDRs) to call down a list of all the potential folks at the account with titles similar to those who held the most authority in their previous sales.

The problem is that they can’t be sure the account is viable, and they have no way of knowing where in the account the behavior is actually coming from. This approach leads to far too much tele-spend and far too little contribution to the pipeline.

Real third-party intent is much more than an old-school lead gen mechanism. Instead, a quality provider should be able to show exactly who is exhibiting purchase behaviors right down to their role and function, their name, and even their contact and consent information.

5. Engage buyers for yourself

Once you’ve located an active buying team with the right information in hand, real purchase intent data puts you in a much better position to drive efficiency by knowing which accounts and buying centers to target.

Likewise, because you can see both who’s interested and what they’re interested in, you’re able to be much more effective with your own outreach. Whether you choose to deploy targeted marketing to nurture these buying groups or address them more aggressively with people-based tactics, you are no longer guessing who exactly to go after and how to open the conversation.

Real purchase intent gives you Amazon-like insight into exactly who is looking for exactly what. What’s more, because this is now data we’re talking about instead of advertising, these buyers are available to you directly, to engage via your own systems and processes.

Not quite Amazon yet, but something you certainly should take advantage of

While each of us is free to evaluate at what point Amazon’s incredible convenience has gone a step too far, the impact of real purchase intent data on those companies that are taking advantage of it is really no longer up for debate.

As we head toward 2019, if you’re looking for a way to accelerate positive change in your demand generation performance and you haven’t investigated the purchase intent resources available in your market, there’s no better time to start than right now.

The post 5 ways to leverage real third-party purchase intent appeared first on Marketing Land.

All copyrights for this article are reserved to their respective authors.

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2017 Marketing Industry News