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Beyond GDPR: what now for digital marketers?

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There were varying degrees of readiness in the marketplace for the introduction of GDPR on 25 May. Larger businesses are typically further forward, given their ability to allocate resources and create specific project teams. Smaller companies are either bringing in outsourced partners or more often having to absorb the requirements into ‘business as usual’, which was always going to make meeting deadlines more challenging.

That said there was always an acknowledgement from the Information Commissioners Officer (ICO) that all companies may not be 100% compliant by the 25 May 2018 deadline, however, as long as there is work on going and plans in place, this is a good start.

Larger organisations face additional challenges with governance and might simply have lost track of access privileges. For example, do internal analysis teams really need access to customers’ names and addresses? There is a blind assumption that big data analysis and data science requires access to personal data. It doesn’t.

One of the major hurdles is that some of the legislation is very technical. Depending on whether organisations and team members have had to deal with similar requests previously will depend on how easily GDPR changes can be translated into day-to-day working practices.

The GDPR data reforms are designed to reflect the world we're living in now so all businesses have a responsibility to address their data ownership and use. There has also been a two-year transition period so there is a reasonable expectation for businesses to have organised themselves to be ready.

New world

The issue of ‘marketing consents’ is the number one challenge facing brands post-GDPR. Consumers have been receiving an extreme number of emails asking them to opt in to marketing communications. It is reasonable to expect the size of marketing databases to reduce but perhaps the silver lining will be improved marketing campaign efficiencies. Brands can also use the legitimate interest clause for communications and providing they have created a number of scenarios as to who can fall under this category and what they can do with these eventualities. Customer service via social channels, competition and promotional prizewinner liaisons are examples of these.

Consultants and analysts who have well-designed data management processes are likely to be at a significant advantage – for example they may already operate on the basis of data minimisation and anonymisation, while at the same time having no system access to any of a client’s personal data.

Don’t freeze

Any new situation can seem daunting and there is a real danger that many teams will experience uncertainty and perhaps even a certain amount of ‘marketing paralysis’ as a result. No brand wants to be on the receiving end of an ICO complaint/enforcement action. The maximum fines of €20 million or 4% of annual turnover will be a significant amount for any company to have to pay.

It is important to note that there is a range of actions other than fines that the ICO can take that are more likely, certainly when a business has made a concerted effort to be compliant. These include warnings, reprimands, ordering specific compliance requests and communicating data breaches.

Marketing teams are undoubtedly one of the most impacted departments by GDPR due to the amount of consumer information and data used in marketing campaigns. However, stay calm and do what marketers do best – focus, target and creatively execute. Targeted campaigns might be reaching a smaller circulation but they will be reaching people who are engaged in your brand and want to hear from you and the rewards will be reaped in results and cost efficiencies.

Now is not the time to panic! Well thought out brand strategies, hyper-targeted campaigns and strong insight-led creative will continue to drive success post GDPR.

Peter Harris is data science director at If Agency

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Data & Analytics

Data: Retailers that can expect to see Black Friday store visits and those that won’t

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Starting tomorrow major retailers are expecting a big uptick in online buying and in-store foot traffic, driven by discounting and the Black Friday shopping frenzy. Gravy Analytics has released data that suggests, based on 2017 data, which stores are likely to see increased foot traffic and which ones will see fewer shoppers in their retail locations.

Traditional retailers set for major foot traffic increases. The data are based on mobile-location store visitation data captured Black Friday week last year. Based on that data, the following are the stores that can expect to see the largest visitation gains and those at the other end.

Foot traffic increases/declines during Black Friday week 2017 compared to previous week

Source: Gravy Analytics (2018)

If the pattern last year holds true in 2018, major traditional retailers can expect to see big increases in store visits. Best Buy, JCPenney and Macy’s in particular saw very significant visitation growth last year during the Black Friday period. Though not included in the partial list above, many discount retailers saw much smaller gains (in single digits) or even losses. Costco was off 4 percent and Dollar Tree was off 1 percent for example.

Fast food, convenience stores down. In general, fast food, grocery, hardware stores, pharmacies, gas stations and convenience stores saw fewer visits. There’s no obvious explanation for this except that people may be seeking to maximize time in major retail stores to get as much shopping done as possible.

There will be other foot-traffic reports out next week. It will be interesting to compare this data is predictive of actual 2018 store visits.

Why you should care. Digital efforts, mobile on particular, have increasingly become a key way for retailers to drive foot traffic year round. These campaigns become even more critical in these key shopping days.

The post Data: Retailers that can expect to see Black Friday store visits and those that won’t appeared first on Marketing Land.

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From Philly to Piccadilly – inside the NFL's UK marketing playbook

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While the NFL faces challenges to its US dominance, its brand-building efforts in the UK (its third-largest market) are delivering record TV audiences, ticket sales, and sponsorship revenue. Now, the NFL aims to convert casual followers into passionate fans of teams such as Super Bowl winners the Philadelphia Eagles, who invested significant marketing dollar during the London Games in October.

Sarah Swanson, NFL UK’s head of marketing since 2015, has been tasked with growing the sport and extending fan engagement beyond the London Games and the Super Bowl. Her mission is to entice fans to watch the Super Bowl playoffs, rather than having fans tuning in only for the big game. This epitomises a strategy to deepen its connection all year round.

Earlier this year, Swanson told The Drum that its two BBC shows, particularly The NFL Show that airs just after the Match of the Day on Saturday, was “the biggest asset we have in this market.” With Sky also airing 100 live NFL games in 2017, the sport boasted 25 million unique UK TV viewers, up 40% increase year-on-year. This figure, Swanson noted, is higher in 2018.

Swanson said: "The strategy is to pull the Super Bowl hype forward and bring fans into the playoffs.”

A big part of this is helping individual franchises form their own fan acquisition strategies.

“In the UK, we have fans of the NFL, in the US we have fans of teams," Swanson said. "You tend to be born into that and it is part of your life and your culture but we do know that when someone chooses a team, they remain connected to the sport for longer throughout the season, rather than a general NFL fan.

“So for us, team growth is so important and to have a club like the Eagles, who are hugely invested in growing their fan base here, it is a great opportunity.”

With the Eagles especially, there was a perfect storm. Never before had a reigning Super Bowl champion team played in the UK. Never before had a visiting team had a UK player either, especially one of the renown of Hackney-born Jay Ajayi. Missing the game due to an operation, Ayayi (pictured below) took the trip across the Atlantic to help cultivate his fan base.

Jay

Loading…

The NFL London Games have accumulated average attendances of 80,000 over the past 11 seasons. In 2018, it sold a record 47,000 season tickets for three games in October: Seattle Seahawks vs Oakland Raiders, Tennessee Titans vs LA Chargers, and Philadelphia Eagles vs Jacksonville Jaguars.

The unprecedented interest in the London Games also enriched the NFL fan database, swelling it from 35,000 to 450,000 addresses. The 2018 fixtures would have driven this higher.

Swanson noted the Eagles' marketing efforts, outlining that team investment helps build out the NFL marketing machine from what is primarily a reliance on earned media and PR.

She said: “They did really fun, locally relevant things that we haven't seen before. They didn't come to market the way they do in Philadelphia, they were fun, tailored and respectful. We worked with them on that. I was great to have a team put that kind of time and resource against this market.”

Show me entity :: 24082

Jennifer Kavanagh, senior vice president of marketing and media at Philadelphia Eagles, outlined that there is a real opportunity for growth in the UK. A significant marketing spend encompassing digital, live activations, social, and out-of-home was aligned to “not just connect with traveling Eagles fans, but hopefully spark new fans.”

Coming to market after winning the Super Bowl certainly served as a point of differentiation against the other teams. “The spotlight got bigger and brighter,” Kavanagh said.

“We are a brand that likes to tell stories, so we have a lot of original content that we create specifically created to help people get to know the team, as well as the individual players, on and off the field.”

For Brits, the team conceived a digital tabloid called the Regal Eagle, to inform of the team’s background and exploits. The point was to stand out from generic football news by using humour and going “slightly outside the box… as comedy is a great way to connect and build relationships with people.”

Digital billboards reimagined distinctive parts of London’s identity, chiefly bangers and mash, royal guards, and the 'mind the gap' announcement.

“We're not just asking people to choose an NFL team, we are asking them to connect with a brand that they identify with," Kavanagh said. "It is easy to understand why we are great as a football team, but this was an opportunity to showcase our personality and spark a connection.”

Show me entity :: 24081

This fan connection has to be strong to account for the time zone difference between the UK and the US — being an NFL fan in the UK often results in a nocturnal viewing habit. Kavanagh shrugged the concern off.

“When you are a fan and are hungry to watch a game, you will. European soccer fans have shown us that stateside. We will never change time zones, but the more the fandom deepens, the more excited people get and start connecting with teams. We make sacrifices for sport, that is what is so great about our fans in general, so I expect they will continue as long as they have to.”

The club now struggles to win over new fans in the states; half of its 7m fans reside in the Philly area. The teams have broken up the US into fiefdoms that has increased the emphasis of securing international followings.

One of the ways to swell international appreciation of the sport was the relaunch of NFL’s over-the-top TV streaming product GamePass.

NFL's Swanson, as part of her remit of extending engagement around the sport, is running a “strong special” discount of £2.99 for the service around Thanksgiving.

This pivotal US holiday has been deeply integrated with the sport since 1978 when the first holiday fixtures occurred. It is an event the league could go bigger on in the UK in the coming years. For now, Swanson is leaning on press and content and influencer marketing, including a segment on BBC’s The NFL Show, to get the word out.

Beyond that, live events factor into building out the fan bases, Swanson and Kavanagh agree.

The NFL’s Regent Street takeover attracted 600k people to the closed-off street. On-stage entertainment, NFL cheerleaders and mascots, pop-ups, kids zones, and merchandise all bulked out the experience.

What set it apart from previous years was that instead of hosting it around the London Games, it was shuffled one month earlier to 8 September to help drive awareness of the events earlier and aid marketing and sales efforts.

Swanson said: “Our intent was to get press coverage and fan engagement, and to drive the fact that the TV show and season was starting, GamePass was available, and our fantasy football was open.

“From a PR perspective, we got a burst of coverage from the start of the season. That strategy to extend the season from kickoff to Super Bowl was different this year; it helped us a lot from a brand awareness standpoint.”

Such efforts help drive commercial growth, she revealed, without detailing the financials that the UK operation has hit a record sponsorship income — chiefly with it being two years into a three year deal with Subway. In particular, she pointed to the fact both brands are pursuing UK growth as an objective alignment that has benefited both.

In many respects, the NFL's efforts to build internationally contrasts with Major League Soccer's (MLS) effort to make the US fall in love with the world's most widely played game.

Gary Stevenson, president and managing director of MLS Business Ventures cited inclusivity, ease to pick up and play, and shorter run-times as perks that will aid the sport's growth in the US.

All copyrights for this article are reserved to their respective authors.

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How NFL and the Eagles are now touching down with the UK beyond the Super Bowl

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While the NFL faces challenges to its US dominance, its brand-building efforts in the UK (its third-largest market) are delivering record TV audiences, ticket sales, and sponsorship revenue. Now, the NFL aims to convert casual followers into passionate fans of teams such as Super Bowl winners the Philadelphia Eagles, who invested significant marketing dollar during the London Games in October.

Sarah Swanson, NFL UK’s head of marketing since 2015, has been tasked with growing the sport and extending fan engagement beyond the London Games and the Super Bowl. Her mission is to entice fans to watch the Super Bowl playoffs, rather than having fans tuning in only for the big game. This epitomises a strategy to deepen its connection all year round.

Earlier this year, Swanson told The Drum that its two BBC shows, particularly The NFL Show that airs just after the Match of the Day on Saturday, was “the biggest asset we have in this market.” With Sky also airing 100 live NFL games in 2017, the sport boasted 25 million unique UK TV viewers, up 40% increase year-on-year. This figure, Swanson noted, is higher in 2018.

Swanson said: "The strategy is to pull the Super Bowl hype forward and bring fans into the playoffs.”

A big part of this is helping individual franchises form their own fan acquisition strategies.

“In the UK, we have fans of the NFL, in the US we have fans of teams," Swanson said. "You tend to be born into that and it is part of your life and your culture but we do know that when someone chooses a team, they remain connected to the sport for longer throughout the season, rather than a general NFL fan.

“So for us, team growth is so important and to have a club like the Eagles, who are hugely invested in growing their fan base here, it is a great opportunity.”

With the Eagles especially, there was a perfect storm. Never before had a reigning Super Bowl champion team played in the UK. Never before had a visiting team had a UK player either, especially one of the renown of Hackney-born Jay Ajayi. Missing the game due to an operation, Ayayi (pictured below) took the trip across the Atlantic to help cultivate his fan base.

Jay

Loading…

The NFL London Games have accumulated average attendances of 80,000 over the past 11 seasons. In 2018, it sold a record 47,000 season tickets for three games in October: Seattle Seahawks vs Oakland Raiders, Tennessee Titans vs LA Chargers, and Philadelphia Eagles vs Jacksonville Jaguars.

The unprecedented interest in the London Games also enriched the NFL fan database, swelling it from 35,000 to 450,000 addresses. The 2018 fixtures would have driven this higher.

Swanson noted the Eagles' marketing efforts, outlining that team investment helps build out the NFL marketing machine from what is primarily a reliance on earned media and PR.

She said: “They did really fun, locally relevant things that we haven't seen before. They didn't come to market the way they do in Philadelphia, they were fun, tailored and respectful. We worked with them on that. I was great to have a team put that kind of time and resource against this market.”

Show me entity :: 24082

Jennifer Kavanagh, senior vice president of marketing and media at Philadelphia Eagles, outlined that there is a real opportunity for growth in the UK. A significant marketing spend encompassing digital, live activations, social, and out-of-home was aligned to “not just connect with traveling Eagles fans, but hopefully spark new fans.”

Coming to market after winning the Super Bowl certainly served as a point of differentiation against the other teams. “The spotlight got bigger and brighter,” Kavanagh said.

“We are a brand that likes to tell stories, so we have a lot of original content that we create specifically created to help people get to know the team, as well as the individual players, on and off the field.”

For Brits, the team conceived a digital tabloid called the Regal Eagle, to inform of the team’s background and exploits. The point was to stand out from generic football news by using humour and going “slightly outside the box… as comedy is a great way to connect and build relationships with people.”

Digital billboards reimagined distinctive parts of London’s identity, chiefly bangers and mash, royal guards, and the 'mind the gap' announcement.

“We're not just asking people to choose an NFL team, we are asking them to connect with a brand that they identify with," Kavanagh said. "It is easy to understand why we are great as a football team, but this was an opportunity to showcase our personality and spark a connection.”

Show me entity :: 24081

This fan connection has to be strong to account for the time zone difference between the UK and the US — being an NFL fan in the UK often results in a nocturnal viewing habit. Kavanagh shrugged the concern off.

“When you are a fan and are hungry to watch a game, you will. European soccer fans have shown us that stateside. We will never change time zones, but the more the fandom deepens, the more excited people get and start connecting with teams. We make sacrifices for sport, that is what is so great about our fans in general, so I expect they will continue as long as they have to.”

The club now struggles to win over new fans in the states; half of its 7m fans reside in the Philly area. The teams have broken up the US into fiefdoms that has increased the emphasis of securing international followings.

One of the ways to swell international appreciation of the sport was the relaunch of NFL’s over-the-top TV streaming product GamePass.

NFL's Swanson, as part of her remit of extending engagement around the sport, is running a “strong special” discount of £2.99 for the service around Thanksgiving.

This pivotal US holiday has been deeply integrated with the sport since 1978 when the first holiday fixtures occurred. It is an event the league could go bigger on in the UK in the coming years. For now, Swanson is leaning on press and content and influencer marketing, including a segment on BBC’s The NFL Show, to get the word out.

Beyond that, live events factor into building out the fan bases, Swanson and Kavanagh agree.

The NFL’s Regent Street takeover attracted 600k people to the closed-off street. On-stage entertainment, NFL cheerleaders and mascots, pop-ups, kids zones, and merchandise all bulked out the experience.

What set it apart from previous years was that instead of hosting it around the London Games, it was shuffled one month earlier to 8 September to help drive awareness of the events earlier and aid marketing and sales efforts.

Swanson said: “Our intent was to get press coverage and fan engagement, and to drive the fact that the TV show and season was starting, GamePass was available, and our fantasy football was open.

“From a PR perspective, we got a burst of coverage from the start of the season. That strategy to extend the season from kickoff to Super Bowl was different this year; it helped us a lot from a brand awareness standpoint.”

Such efforts help drive commercial growth, she revealed, without detailing the financials that the UK operation has hit a record sponsorship income — chiefly with it being two years into a three year deal with Subway. In particular, she pointed to the fact both brands are pursuing UK growth as an objective alignment that has benefited both.

In many respects, the NFL's efforts to build internationally contrasts with Major League Soccer's (MLS) effort to make the US fall in love with the world's most widely played game.

Gary Stevenson, president and managing director of MLS Business Ventures cited inclusivity, ease to pick up and play, and shorter run-times as perks that will aid the sport's growth in the US.

All copyrights for this article are reserved to their respective authors.

Continue Reading

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