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Former Paddy Power marketer: CMOs spending big to sponsor World Cup 'should be shot'

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Fifa boasts an almost full stable of sponsors ahead of World Cup 2018 despite these official partnerships costing as much as £100m annually. Ken Robertson, ambush marketing expert and former head of mischief at bookmaker Paddy Power believes that any CMO considering this investment "should be shot".

Russia will be ripe for ambush marketing, be it on the ground, or on social media from brands who have deemed not to invest in troubled football body Fifa's tournament. But they will have a tough time finding loopholes and vulnerabilities in Fifa's thick rule book which among other things protects its IP and the tournament's exclusivity to sponsors.

Since 2012, it has had ambush marketing on lockdown and it all comes back to a stunt from Robertson and the team at Paddy Power – starring Danish striker Nicholas Bendtner.

Denmark vs Portugal – Euro 2012

Paddy Power set up a "classic ambush" during the game. If Bendtner scored, he was to pull down his shorts and reveal his lucky Paddy Power pants.

Robertson recalls the incident wasn't quite smooth sailing. "We agreed if he scored he would unveil his lucky Paddy Power underwear but he scored the first goal and he didn't do it, we thought he bottled it.

"Ronaldo then equalised, so then true to form Bendtner goes up and scores the winner and revealed the lucky pants."

Video of Paddy Power Lucky Pants – Bendtner Euro 2012

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A pair of branded pants spurned Uefa, and by extension Fifa, to introduce severe penalties for brands intruding into the space. Bendtner was fined £80,000 and was suspended from the next fixture.

He breached a rule stating: "Players must not reveal undershirts which contain slogans or advertising. A player removing his jersey to reveal slogans will be sanctioned by the competition organiser."

Additionally, The Danish FA was sponsored by another betting company in Ladbrokes – it was not too happy with Bendtner's shenanigans.

Since this transgression, Uefa rules have changed. Fines are unlimited and are aimed at the football associations instead of the players. "That pretty much eliminated the opportunity for that kind of ambush," admits Robertson.

No longer could brands like Paddy Power – or Bavaria – cause a ruckus during the matches.

Shave the rainforest

Two years later, Robertson was looking to cause a stir at the World Cup in Brazil. With the physical stadiums effectively closed to on-the-pitch disruptions, the brand instead let social media and the press do the hard work. Robertson honed in on the issue of deforestation and created a devious piece of fake news – a not-very-good photoshop of the rainforest felled to read 'C'mon England PP'.

He says: "We saw the opportunity to shine a light on this issue by orchestrating what you would call a masterclass in fake news. We led people to believe that we had chopped down a massive swathe of the rainforest. We leaked the photographs and stepped away from it and let the whole thing percolate."

"We became part of the World Cup narrative by perpetrating this hoax and then revealing it was actually a collaboration with Greenpeace. All of a sudden, you go from sinner to saint, you elevate the brand into the narrative."

It was not all smooth sailing for the bookmaker. In 2018, with fake news an even touchier subject, it may have been a disastrous effort. In 2017, 20th Century Fox had to apologise for utilsing fake news websites in the marketing campaign publicising horror movie ‘A Cure for Wellness’.

Nonetheless, back then, viewers were somewhat more forgiving: "Until we did the rug pull we were absolutely vilified on social media. We had Hollywood actors who hadn't even heard of Paddy Power were now giving us an incredible platform in the days leading up to this event."

Video of Paddy Power – Shave the Rainforest

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While the battlegrounds, or ambush spots, for brands wanting a say in World Cup discourse may have moved, Robertson's definition holds true. "Ambush marketing, in essence, means attaching your brand to something you don't have a commercial interest in. Recently we've had to come at it more laterally."

Doing the unexpected helps elevate brands he says citing getting Dr Stephen Hawking on board to grant England the winning formula for Euro 2016. It's all part of the public's demand for "more sophisticated communications".

A warning to CMOS

This also applies to official sponsors who Robertson did not hazard particularly kind words for. "Any CMO who spends £100m on a category sponsorship at a World Cup should be shot, I think it is an appalling waste of money. It is a wallpaper logo. People expect more from brands now than seeing it on the perimeter boards during a major event. These partnerships show a lack of imagination and even some insecurity from the brand."

It may come as no surprise that official World Cup sponsor Visa disagrees with this assessment. Chris Curtin, chief brand and innovation marketing officer at Visa, told The Drum that the World Cup is one of the "last unchallenged bastions of appointment viewing," he added that it boasts the "the biggest audiences in the world, the events themselves stand for things that Visa stands for". Fifa estimates that the tournament will reach as many as 3.2bn people. Only about half of this figure live in households with a TV and there are only 7.6bn people on the planet – showing the sheer scale of viewership.

Similarly, AB InBev has concocted its largest ever marketing campaign to support Budweisers partnership with the Games.

Fifa has struggled to drum up sponsors for the big event in light of its corruption scandal and internal investigations. Even in Russian, sponsorship uptake was slower than expected with Gazprom joining Alfa-Bank and Rostelecom on the roster. Famously, space opened up after Continental, Johnson & Johnson and Castrol all backed out in 2015.

Outside of this elite, many upstart brands may be looking at the World Cup in Russia as an opportunity to say something, whether that is condemning the political situation in Russia, its attitudes towards LGBT people and free speech – or even questioning the morals of brands who claim they are operating in a political vacuum, focused only on the football.

To these gutsy brands who may swing a punch, Robertson said: "I tip my hat to any brands willing to have a crack at the World Cup and Russia. We're working on a campaign that ticks that box. It is a fertile place for a brand to play in, it is not without risk but it plays into the very interesting narrative at the moment that is more than football and sport."

He concluded: "You can't operate detached from the political, the lines are blurry at the moment. The narrative around political stability, homophobia and more. It cannot just be football. No way."

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Government U-turns: it will consider junk food TV ad ban under new plan to curb child obesity

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The government is to begin talks on a potential ban of junk food advertising on TV before the 9pm watershed as part of a range of new measures announced today (24 June) to halve the number of obese children by 2030.

The government’s latest obesity plan follows the first “chapter” which was released in 2016, which brought in the fizzy drinks tax and a voluntary scheme for the food industry to reduce the amount of sugar in food and drink.

The 2016 plan also introduced tougher rules around advertising to under-16s across non-broadcast media (print, cinema, online and social media), but the government opted not impose regulations on marketing of junk food, a move welcomed by advertisers.

However, it has since faced pressure from a number of organisations, including Cancer Research, to ban adverts for foods high in fat and sugar prior to the 9pm watershed.

The government has since conceded, saying it will begin consultations on introducing new TV and online advertising restrictions “to prevent children from being targeted by these unhealthy products, and to incentivise companies to reduce the sugar and calories in the products they sell.”

It said this could include extending the current advertising watershed and limit the number of unhealthy food adverts shown during children’s programmes up to 9pm.

In the interim, the government has called on industry to “recognise the harm that adverts for foods high in fat, sugar and salt can cause.”

However, industry bodies have not welcomed the U-turn from the government.

“International experience and independent research has shown advertising bans have little impact on the wider societal issues that drive obesity, which is caused by the interaction of many complex factors and requires a multi-faceted solution,” said Stephen Woodford, chief executive of the Advertising Association.

“Here in the UK, interventions such as The Daily Mile in schools have been successful as they are simple, cost-free and inclusive and not only impact on obesity levels, but improve behaviour, academic performance and children’s wellbeing. This is exactly the sort of partnership needed to tackle Britain’s obesity challenge.”

James Barge, director of public affairs at ISBA said there is “no silver-bullet” to reducing childhood obesity and stressed the need for a “holistic and multi-dimensional response.”

“As such, whilst we oppose the blunt instrument of a 9pm watershed we will, as an evidence-led industry, support steps which can be proven to proportionately reduce children’s exposure to HFSS advertising,” he said.

“ISBA looks forward to seeing more details of the government’s proposed approach and to engaging constructively with a view to shaping a simple, evidence-led and proportionate outcome which supports the aim of meaningfully reducing childhood obesity levels.”

Tim Rycroft, director of corporate affairs at the Food and Drink Federation, added: “While the commitment to full consultation on these measures is welcome, tthere will be deep disquiet in the food and drink manufacturing sector. Advertising and promotions underpin the healthy, vibrant and innovative market for food and drink that UK shoppers love.”

Under the new obesity plan, the government will also consult on a ban on the sale of energy drinks to children.

More immediate action will see the ushering in of new regulation to ban shops from offering special ‘two for the price of one’ deals for food high in sugar, fat or salt alongside rules which will require restaurants and takeaways to show the number of calories clearly on menus.

Health secretary Jeremy Hunt said: “It is near impossible to shield children from exposure to unhealthy foods. Parents are asking for help – we know that over three quarters of parents find offers for sugary sweets and snacks at checkouts annoying.

“It’s our job to give power to parents to make healthier choices, and to make their life easier in doing so.”

According to official figures, one in three children in the UK are now obese by the time they leave primary school.

All copyrights for this article are reserved to their respective authors.

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Party police raids, drug ‘stings’ & divas: The Drum's Cannes Lions 2018 gossip column

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Cannes Lions is over for another year, but as the rosé turns sticky on the floor of the Gutter Bar and you think of ways to explain the ROI on entertaining clients with €30 burrata every night to your finance manager, there’s one thing that’s sure to follow you home on that Jet2 flight – all the gossip.

What happens in Cannes famously doesn’t stay in Cannes. The Drum’s moles were on the ground, and our very own pub – The Drum Arms – which gave us plenty of access to the scandals happening behind the scenes.

Find out what went on away from the buzz of the Palais from noise complaints to entitled celebrities, The Drum's drummers causing chaos on the strip and the magnetic pull of Sir John Hegarty… ooh la la indeed.

Duty free

A French air traffic control strike the weekend before Cannes led to topsy-turvy, rerouted trips across Europe for hundreds of delegates on route to the Riviera; we heard of attendees flying via Cologne, Milan and even Luxembourg to make sure they didn’t miss that 9am breakfast meeting.

But which programmatic supremo was spotted making the most of his delayed flight in the airport bar? His penchant for Gatwick’s champagne led to an impulsive – and most likely expensive – Lacoste shopping spree.

Don’t call it a comeback

He may have lost the ‘most powerful man in advertising’ crown but yet again Sir Martin Sorrell managed to become the biggest story of the week. There were plenty of whispers about whether he'd show up to Cannes following the events of recent months – but oddly, we’ve rarely seen him look so relaxed. Some attendees even asked The Drum what we were really planning on doing, assuming the interview at the pub was really a publicity stunt (as if we would ever…!)

But from the moment he arrived at The Drum Arms for his first post-WPP interview (through the back door, naturally) it was clear that the outspoken bean counter was back with a vengeance.

After laying into the big six networks, the Financial Times’ reporting and WPP’s handling of his resignation, he slipped out faster than you can say ‘Q&A’.

Martin Sorrell on why he wants Mark Read and Andrew Scott to replace him as co-CEOs #thedrumcannes https://t.co/3lp8PKQpsd pic.twitter.com/slwCT3EK5s

— The Drum (@TheDrum) June 21, 2018

He recycled a handful of pre-prepared jokes when he spoke at the Palais on Friday, however the audience was less sympathetic to the freshly tanned millionaire: delegates booed as he filibustered his own session instead of answering questions from journalist Ken Auletta.

Do ad execs shit in the woods?

Which glamorous party had a distinct lack of toilets for the 500+ people it invited to its celeb-filled celebration? One desperate marketer charmingly told The Drum staff he was going to do a Bear Grylls and “poo in the woods”.

It’s not clear if he was joking or not but he did wander off into the night, which begs the question: if a client does a number two in a forest and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound?

Diva on the docks

This East End pop star embraced her inner Mariah Carey this week. When arriving at the port for a night on the yachts she refused to leave her bejewelled high heels on the jetty, forcing staff to choose between a great PR opportunity and their boat hire deposit.

Later, when the same London diva was refused entry to an over-capacity agency party she loudly declared the shop’s comms director was a “jobsworth” in front of their colleagues. It must have been a damned good party! Brits abroad, eh?

A sticky situation

The Carlton’s unfathomable pricing strategy leaves many a suit feeling extorted when the bill arrives. But which creative director was stung big time by Cannes’ hustling drug dealers?

After requesting a wrap of unidentified white powder and paying out €200, his teenage vendor scarpered into the night. Only later did he realise he was actually the proud owner of a rolled-up wrap of sticky tape.

Cooking doesn’t get tougher than this

This year’s News UK party, once again hosted a atop a giant hill at the Château de Garibondy was an absolute hive of gossip. With a set from Kylie, Idris Elba and Fatboy Slim on the decks and a pool stocked with pink flamingos, the glitz and glamour was unrivaled elsewhere.

Aussie chef John Torode was even spotted cooking up a storm at the BBQ, but The Drum’s roving reporters couldn’t help but notice he looked grumpier than a unsuccessful Masterchef contestant.

To be fair, it’s probably not much fun grilling brisket in the blistering heat while drunken ad execs guzzle elderflower gin and tonics around you. It looked like he cheered up a bit later though, when he and his wife Lisa Faulkner got a snap with the Spinning Around singer.

Great night with @JohnTorode1 & @lisafaulkner1 in charge of the #bbq tonight at #newschateau!! & a M&G with @kylieminogue what a party pic.twitter.com/QRD0hh8Yqs — Sean Fitzpatrick (@MySeanySean) June 21, 2018

The crowd went absolutely wild for Kylie, with one chief marketing officer dancing non-stop for the whole session and another top creative giving it his all during Can't Get You Out of My Head.

Praise you like I should

Fatboy Slim, meanwhile, wins the Gold Lion for nicest celebrity of the festival. We heard he spent an hour before his set hanging out with fans and taking pictures. Eat, sleep, network, repeat, right?

Post-party chaos

It's a shame then, that the plug was literally pulled on Fatboy Slim's set. Organisers were believed to have been sticking to strict timings to avoid catching the attention of the French police; a plan which ultimately failed.

The Drum understands News UK was issued fines of €60 and then €1,000. Hearsay on the ground said this was due to noise complaints, but as more officers showed up just as the party was ending, rumours swirled that it was because a rowdy group of underage teenagers wanted to rave to Fatboy.

The police presence then stopped planned pick-up cars from driving up to collect worse-for-wear guests from the château. This resulted in dozens of high-heeled delegates winding their way down a steep, tree-lined hill in the pitch black to hitch a ride back to their hotels – lions, and tigers and swears, oh my!

Heartthrob Hegarty

In case you were wondering, Sir John Hegarty has still got it. After he spoke at a press conference, the scenes of female fans flocking for some facetime with the BBH founder were akin to Channing Tatum’s media lounge appearance in 2016. One journalist even invited him to spend a holiday with her in Colombia – whenever, wherever!

Sacré bleu!

Which restaurant along Le Croisette doesn’t believe in ‘going dutch’ – or, indeed #TimesUp? During one dinner, we were told waiting staff handed out gender-specific menus where the women don’t see the prices.

Staff from one media firm were shocked to discover this when they noticed that only the sole male of the group could see the cost on the menu he was handed. Lucky fella.

No cameras please

This US star came to the speaker's corner of the press lounge to talk business, but was left frustrated after the reporting media failed to ask any her questions at all about the announcement she made.

She rolled her eyes when a bunch of journalists instead swarmed around her for videos and selfies once she was done.

On the ball

Speaking of celebs, did we mention that we interviewed former England manager Sam Allardyce?

In conversation before the England v Tunisia game at the TalkSport bar, he predicted the right score and told us over a Guinness that he doesn’t think Stevie G, Frank Lampard or Joey Barton will still be in a job come next summer.

sam allardyce the drum

Loading…

Here he is with The Drum's video producer Jamie McMurray and editor Stephen Lepitak.

Jambon ou fromage?

A journalist’s diet at Cannes usually consists of aspirin, coffee and rosé, accompanied by agency dinners if you're lucky or McDonald’s if you're not. But this year it all changed with the introduction of the press room buffet – a revelation that appeared around 3pm every day.

On the Monday there was cheese and bread. On the Tuesday there was ham and bread. Rumours spread that the much-anticipated French coupling of cheese AND ham would arrive on the Wednesday. But alas – never the two did meet.

Band on the run

We were so enamored with The Drum’s new branding that we flew a band of drummers from London to France for the week. Their job was to disrupt the industry – literally – with the harmonious sounds of banging and hollering. Unfortunately, not everyone was a fan.

The police and event security asked the troop to “allons-y!” on several occasions, and Campaign sent them packing from outside their 50th birthday celebrations.

The biggest reaction came when the band surprised our friends at Ad Age – and were subsequently manhandled out of the area.

Show me entity :: 20943

The Drum's editor-in-chief and founder Gordon Young even got involved in the action earlier on in the week. Here he is leading the merry band in front of a refined audience at the Gutter Bar.

Show me entity :: 20946

All stood up

Which social figure left The Drum reporters waiting 90 minutes for an interview? After an hour and a half of waiting (with only frantic texts from her PR to give us hope) we gave up – only to land an interview with Nikolaj Coster-Waldau, aka Game of Thrones' Jaime Lannister, a few boats down. Both his hands were fully operational.

ForgetfulLAD

Which well-known industry PR was said to have his laptop at the Lad Bible villa, only to realise it was missing on is way to the airport. His cab had to turn around so he could return to collect the computer.

It's not clear whether he left it during the social publisher's party on the Tuesday night, which looked a bit like a session at the Love Island villa.

Live From The @ladbible Villa Pool Party #Cannes pic.twitter.com/70fuAdvm7n — DJ Luck & MC Neat (@LucknNeat) June 19, 2018

There's no doubt the Lad Bible crew were partying hard the rest of the week, since the group's 'Trash Isles' campaign scooped a number of Lions.

Too brave?

The Marketing Society's well-intentioned 'brave'-themed lunch proved a bit too bold for some attendees, with one unadventurous guest suggesting that even Heston Blumenthal might have snubbed some of the concoctions on offer.

Can't fight the moonlight

One Australian agency got a bit excitable in the car on its way to one of the many events. As the poor driver weaved his way through the rolling Riviera hills, too much pre-8pm rosé (we heard them say they paid €350 for a bottle) had gone to the execs' heads.

Unprompted, one of the group put LeAnn Rimes' 90s classic Can't Fight the Moonlight on full blast in the backseat, loudly singing along and trying to get our reporters to dance. We preferred the original.

You can follow all The Drum's Cannes Lions coverage here, with more exclusives and one-on-one interviews to follow next week.

All copyrights for this article are reserved to their respective authors.

Continue Reading

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Party police raids, drug stings and divas: The Drum's Cannes Lions 2018 gossip column

Published

on

Cannes Lions is over for another year, but as the rosé turns sticky on the floor of the Gutter Bar and you think of ways to explain the ROI on entertaining clients with €30 burrata every night to your finance manager, there’s one thing that’s sure to follow you home on that Jet2 flight – all the gossip.

What happens in Cannes famously doesn’t stay in Cannes. The Drum’s moles were on the ground, and our very own pub – The Drum Arms – which gave us plenty of access to the scandals happening behind the scenes.

Find out what went on away from the buzz of the Palais from noise complaints to entitled celebrities, The Drum's drummers causing chaos on the strip and the magnetic pull of Sir John Hegarty… ooh la la indeed.

Duty free

A French air traffic control strike the weekend before Cannes led to topsy-turvy, rerouted trips across Europe for hundreds of delegates on route to the Riviera; we heard of attendees flying via Cologne, Milan and even Luxembourg to make sure they didn’t miss that 9am breakfast meeting.

But which programmatic supremo was spotted making the most of his delayed flight in the airport bar? His penchant for Gatwick’s champagne led to an impulsive – and most likely expensive – Lacoste shopping spree.

Don’t call it a comeback

He may have lost the ‘most powerful man in advertising’ crown but yet again Sir Martin Sorrell managed to become the biggest story of the week. There were plenty of whispers about whether he'd show up to Cannes following the events of recent months – but oddly, we’ve rarely seen him look so relaxed. Some attendees even asked The Drum what we were really planning on doing, assuming the interview at the pub was really a publicity stunt (as if we would ever…!)

But from the moment he arrived at The Drum Arms for his first post-WPP interview (through the back door, naturally) it was clear that the outspoken bean counter was back with a vengeance.

After laying into the big six networks, the Financial Times’ reporting and WPP’s handling of his resignation, he slipped out faster than you can say ‘Q&A’.

Martin Sorrell on why he wants Mark Read and Andrew Scott to replace him as co-CEOs #thedrumcannes https://t.co/3lp8PKQpsd pic.twitter.com/slwCT3EK5s

— The Drum (@TheDrum) June 21, 2018

He recycled a handful of pre-prepared jokes when he spoke at the Palais on Friday, however the audience was less sympathetic to the freshly tanned millionaire: delegates booed as he filibustered his own session instead of answering questions from journalist Ken Auletta.

Do ad execs shit in the woods?

Which glamorous party had a distinct lack of toilets for the 500+ people it invited to its celeb-filled celebration? One desperate marketer charmingly told The Drum staff he was going to do a Bear Grylls and “poo in the woods”.

It’s not clear if he was joking or not but he did wander off into the night, which begs the question: if a client does a number two in a forest and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound?

Diva on the docks

This East End pop star embraced her inner Mariah Carey this week. When arriving at the port for a night on the yachts she refused to leave her bejewelled high heels on the jetty, forcing staff to choose between a great PR opportunity and their boat hire deposit.

Later, when the same London diva was refused entry to an over-capacity agency party she loudly declared the shop’s comms director was a “jobsworth” in front of their colleagues. It must have been a damned good party! Brits abroad, eh?

A sticky situation

The Carlton’s unfathomable pricing strategy leaves many a suit feeling extorted when the bill arrives. But which creative director was stung big time by Cannes’ hustling drug dealers?

After requesting a wrap of unidentified white powder and paying out €200, his teenage vendor scarpered into the night. Only later did he realise he was actually the proud owner of a rolled-up wrap of sticky tape.

Cooking doesn’t get tougher than this

This year’s News UK party, once again hosted a atop a giant hill at the Château de Garibondy was an absolute hive of gossip. With a set from Kylie, Idris Elba and Fatboy Slim on the decks and a pool stocked with pink flamingos, the glitz and glamour was unrivaled elsewhere.

Aussie chef John Torode was even spotted cooking up a storm at the BBQ, but The Drum’s roving reporters couldn’t help but notice he looked grumpier than a unsuccessful Masterchef contestant.

To be fair, it’s probably not much fun grilling brisket in the blistering heat while drunken ad execs guzzle elderflower gin and tonics around you. It looked like he cheered up a bit later though, when he and his wife Lisa Faulkner got a snap with the Spinning Around singer.

Great night with @JohnTorode1 & @lisafaulkner1 in charge of the #bbq tonight at #newschateau!! & a M&G with @kylieminogue what a party pic.twitter.com/QRD0hh8Yqs — Sean Fitzpatrick (@MySeanySean) June 21, 2018

The crowd went absolutely wild for Kylie, with one chief marketing officer dancing non-stop for the whole session and another top creative giving it his all during Can't Get You Out of My Head.

Praise you like I should

Fatboy Slim, meanwhile, wins the Gold Lion for nicest celebrity of the festival. We heard he spent an hour before his set hanging out with fans and taking pictures. Eat, sleep, network, repeat, right?

Post-party chaos

It's a shame then, that the plug was literally pulled on Fatboy Slim's set. Organisers were believed to have been sticking to strict timings to avoid catching the attention of the French police; a plan which ultimately failed.

The Drum understands News UK was issued fines of €60 and then €1,000. Hearsay on the ground said this was due to noise complaints, but as more officers showed up just as the party was ending, rumours swirled that it was because a rowdy group of underage teenagers wanted to rave to Fatboy.

The police presence then stopped planned pick-up cars from driving up to collect worse-for-wear guests from the château. This resulted in dozens of high-heeled delegates winding their way down a steep, tree-lined hill in the pitch black to hitch a ride back to their hotels – lions, and tigers and swears, oh my!

Heartthrob Hegarty

In case you were wondering, Sir John Hegarty has still got it. After he spoke at a press conference, the scenes of female fans flocking for some facetime with the BBH founder were akin to Channing Tatum’s media lounge appearance in 2016. One journalist even invited him to spend a holiday with her in Colombia – whenever, wherever!

Sacré bleu!

Which restaurant along Le Croisette doesn’t believe in ‘going dutch’ – or, indeed #TimesUp? During one dinner, we were told waiting staff handed out gender-specific menus where the women don’t see the prices.

Staff from one media firm were shocked to discover this when they noticed that only the sole male of the group could see the cost on the menu he was handed. Lucky fella.

No cameras please

This US star came to the speaker's corner of the press lounge to talk business, but was left frustrated after the reporting media failed to ask any her questions at all about the announcement she made.

She rolled her eyes when a bunch of journalists instead swarmed around her for videos and selfies once she was done.

On the ball

Speaking of celebs, did we mention that we interviewed former England manager Sam Allardyce?

In conversation before the England v Tunisia game at the TalkSport bar, he predicted the right score and told us over a Guinness that he doesn’t think Stevie G, Frank Lampard or Joey Barton will still be in a job come next summer.

sam allardyce the drum

Loading…

Here he is with The Drum's video producer Jamie McMurray and editor Stephen Lepitak.

Jambon ou fromage?

A journalist’s diet at Cannes usually consists of aspirin, coffee and rosé, accompanied by agency dinners if you're lucky or McDonald’s if you're not. But this year it all changed with the introduction of the press room buffet – a revelation that appeared around 3pm every day.

On the Monday there was cheese and bread. On the Tuesday there was ham and bread. Rumours spread that the much-anticipated French coupling of cheese AND ham would arrive on the Wednesday. But alas – never the two did meet.

Band on the run

We were so enamored with The Drum’s new branding that we flew a band of drummers from London to France for the week. Their job was to disrupt the industry – literally – with the harmonious sounds of banging and hollering. Unfortunately, not everyone was a fan.

The police and event security asked the troop to “allons-y!” on several occasions, and Campaign sent them packing from outside their 50th birthday celebrations.

The biggest reaction came when the band surprised our friends at Ad Age – and were subsequently manhandled out of the area.

Show me entity :: 20943

The Drum's editor-in-chief and founder Gordon Young even got involved in the action earlier on in the week. Here he is leading the merry band in front ofaudie a refined audience at the Gutter Bar.

Show me entity :: 20946

All stood up

Which social figure left The Drum reporters waiting 90 minutes for an interview? After an hour and a half of waiting (with only frantic texts from her PR to give us hope) we gave up – only to land an interview with Nikolaj Coster-Waldau, aka Game of Thrones' Jaime Lannister, a few boats down. Both his hands were fully operational.

ForgetfulLAD

Which well-known industry PR was said to have his laptop at the Lad Bible villa, only to realise it was missing on is way to the airport. His cab had to turn around so he could return to collect the computer.

It's not clear whether he left it during the social publisher's party on the Tuesday night, which looked a bit like a session at the Love Island villa.

Live From The @ladbible Villa Pool Party #Cannes pic.twitter.com/70fuAdvm7n — DJ Luck & MC Neat (@LucknNeat) June 19, 2018

There's no doubt the Lad Bible crew were partying hard the rest of the week, since the group's 'Trash Isles' campaign scooped a number of Lions.

Too brave?

The Marketing Society's well-intentioned 'brave'-themed lunch proved a bit too bold for some attendees, with one unadventurous guest suggesting that even Heston Blumenthal might have snubbed some of the concoctions on offer.

Can't fight the moonlight

One Australian agency got a bit excitable in the car on its way to one of the many events. As the poor driver weaved his way through the rolling Riviera hills, too much pre-8pm rosé (we heard them say they paid €350 for a bottle) had gone to the execs' heads.

Unprompted, one of the group put LeAnn Rimes' 90s classic Can't Fight the Moonlight on full blast in the backseat, loudly singing along and trying to get our reporters to dance. We preferred the original.

You can follow all The Drum's Cannes Lions coverage here, with more exclusives and one-on-one interviews to follow next week.

All copyrights for this article are reserved to their respective authors.

Continue Reading

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