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British Vogue plots next phase of diversity drive as ethnicity focus courts bigger ad budgets

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British Vogue claimed its revamped approach to diversity has seen revenues rise and attracted a range of previously untapped advertisers, successes its publishing director hopes will continue as the magazine grows its inclusion agenda beyond ethnicity and into age.

The 100-year-old brand went through a raft of changes last year when Alexandra Schulman, its editor-in-chief of 25 years, was replaced by Edward Enninful: the title’s first black, male, and openly gay editorial chief. He immediately began addressing historic criticisms that Vogue was racially non-diverse in both its content and staff base, selecting Adwoa Aboah as his first cover model in for the December 2017 issue.

The cover and issue were lauded, but when the February issue was revealed to be fronted by white actresses Nicole Kidman and Margot Robbie, Enninful was criticised for slipping back into the whitewashing days of before.

Yet the inclusion of 50-year-old Kidman was actually part of a strategy to promote another kind of diversity.

“One of the areas of diversity that Edward takes very seriously is age,” explained the brand’s publishing director, Vanessa Kingori.

“He has a lot of friends in the beauty industry, the fashion industry and the film industry and they witness the challenges of people aging in and out of the spotlight. Without much fanfare about her age, Nicole Kidman was on the cover and there was a really interesting response of ‘Where’s the diversity?’ It’s really interesting that people can’t see [diversity of age].”

She noted that the act of putting people of colour on magazine covers has become an easy shorthand for open-mindedness, and while she believes this representation is a good starting point, “it’s only the beginning”.

“What I want to know is, what about hard conversations?” Kingori said. “What about things that are more difficult to convey on the cover? I’m a big advocate of true inclusion.”

Kingori, who joined from GQ as Enninful prepared to make his Vogue debut, sees it as her job to prove that diversity is “good for business”.

She revealed that digital revenues have risen by more than 25% since Enninful’s takeover and a “whole new plethora” of brands have come knocking at the door. These include the likes of Nike, which is embracing Vogue’s fresh embrace of health and wellness coverage alongside its fashion editorial, and, interestingly, Christian Louboutin.

“When we spoke to Christian he said, ‘I’ve never felt the need to advertise because everyone knows what my brand is, but now you’re the only brand that’s speaking in a language that reflects mine’,” explained Kingori. The shoemaker is just one of the brands showing particular interest in Vogue’s branded content unit, which the publisher describes as “one of the most important pillars of our advertising”, alongside experiential.

“[Content marketing] is still about beautiful imagery – perhaps even more so – but it’s also about narratives that reflect intelligent women that are challenging,” she said. “Now we talk about women’s triumphs and challenges, such as miscarriage. That would never have been Vogue territory before. Brands have been really engaged with the [new] editorial narrative.”

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Marketing Day: LinkedIn redesigns Groups, Google Location History, sales funnels & more

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Here’s our recap of what happened in online marketing today, as reported on Marketing Land and other places across the web.

From Marketing Land:

Recent Headlines From MarTech Today, Our Sister Site Dedicated To Marketing Technology:

Online Marketing News From Around The Web:

The post Marketing Day: LinkedIn redesigns Groups, Google Location History, sales funnels & more appeared first on Marketing Land.

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Expanded phrase match negatives: A script for misspellings

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As paid search specialists, our strength lies in our ability to exert control over our keyword targeting. Every month or so, there are new threats to this control. We must be strong in battling this pay-per-click (PPC) kryptonite. We must build super automation to help save the world from bad PPC!

That is why we at Brainlabs (my company) have created another Google Ads script, this time to help you control the impact of negative keywords. The challenge with negative keywords is getting the balance right. Too little control, and you’ll include budget-draining mismatches. Too much, and you risk losing out on potential customers. To filter traffic for high- and low-value searches, you need just the right touch.

Getting the hang of it takes a bit of trial and error, but using a script to help you along doesn’t hurt. Today, I’m sharing an awesome script that will boost your phrase negative keyword matching by finding the ones you’re failing to catch due to misspellings.

Using negative keywords

We all know that without the right keyword, your ads won’t be triggered when a user enters a search term. Unlike preplanned keywords, search terms are liable to all sorts of inconsistencies.

Advertising platforms like Google Ads offer different ways to match keywords to search terms: broad, broad match modifier, phrase, and exact. Whichever you prefer to work with, you’ll know that planning ahead for human error can be difficult. Luckily, these match types can deal with close variants like misspellings, plurals, broad match, synonyms and related searches.

[Read the full article on Search Engine Land.]

The post Expanded phrase match negatives: A script for misspellings appeared first on Marketing Land.

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Amazon Music animates Ariana Grande, Kendrick Lamar and SZA in ad campaign for the service

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Amazon Music is pushing its paid streaming music service with a new campaign as a way for listeners to power their preferences by using Alexa.

The service is building on its momentum with the launch of ‘A Voice is All You Need.’ The campaign highlights the powerful vocals of notable songs while demonstrating the simplicity of voice with Alexa, featuring leading artists at launch including Ariana Grande, Kendrick Lamar, SZA, Queen and Kane Brown.

The ad creative, developed with Wieden+Kennedy, celebrates the growth of Amazon Music against rivals like Apple and Spotify, by noting its lead in voice innovation while playing off isolated vocals from notable artists in a journey through the voice experience with Alexa on Amazon Music.

In the first video, Kendrick Lamar and SZA’s All the Stars gets animated in a 30-second spot that starts off with brightly hued lips singing the lyrics. The lips then turn blue as the Lamar’s rap begins, then morphs into the Amazon arrow, which also turns into a mouth and asks Alexa to play the song as it promotes the 30-day free trial for the service.

Another ad rises high above Times Square to push Ariana Grande’s new album, Sweetener. The three-tiered digital ad starts with the ‘A Voice is All You Need’ phrase, then turns rainbow colored with a pic from the album and the text: “Alexa Play New Ariana Grande.”

Launching at a time where the number of Amazon Music hours streamed globally on Alexa-enabled devices has doubled over the past six months compared to the same time last year, ‘A Voice is All You Need’ will begin appearing today in select US cities, and will expand to the UK and Germany throughout the year across media channels including national online video, radio, and out-of-home billboard advertisements in support of upcoming new releases. Select creative from the campaign will also appear on national TV later this year.

Wieden+Kennedy: Amazon Music 'A Voice is All You Need'

Agency: Wieden+Kennedy
Client: Amazon Music
Date: August 2018

The service is building on its momentum with the launch of ‘A Voice is All You Need.’ The campaign highlights the powerful vocals of notable songs while demonstrating the simplicity of voice with Alexa, featuring leading artists at launch including Ariana Grande, Kendrick Lamar, SZA, Queen and Kane Brown.
The ad creative, developed with Wieden+Kennedy, celebrates the growth of Amazon Music against rivals like Apple and Spotify, by noting its lead in voice innovation while playing off isolated vocals from notable artists in a journey through the voice experience with Alexa on Amazon Music.
In the first video, Kendrick Lamar and SZA’s All the Stars gets animated in a 30-second spot that starts off with brightly hued lips singing the lyrics. The lips then turn blue as the Lamar’s rap begins, then morphs into the Amazon arrow, which also turns into a mouth and asks Alexa to play the song as it promotes the 30-day free trial for the service.
Another ad rises high above Times Square to push Ariana Grande’s new album, Sweetener. The three-tiered digital ad starts with the ‘A Voice is All You Need’ phrase, then turns rainbow colored with a pic from the album and the text: “Alexa Play New Ariana Grande.”

Credits:
Agency: Wieden+Kennedy
Client: Amazon Music

Tags: United States

Video of A Voice is All You Need: Amazon Music Advertising in Times Square, New York

Video of A Voice Is All You Need: Kendrick Lamar and SZA, "All The Stars," for Amazon Music

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