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RNIB get a feel for Christmas with launch of Braille greeting cards

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A series of Braille Christmas cards to support the RNIB (Royal National Institute of Blind people) has been created by Chapter to allow blind and partially sighted people to ‘Feel Christmas’. With the central thought being ‘It’s beginning to feel a lot like Christmas’ each card features a popular Christmas lyric set in Braille.

Ian Boulter, Chapter creative director, said, "We create a card every year, but this year we wanted to do something to help others. We felt that as we work in such a visual industry, we could only imagine what it would be like not to experience the Christmas period to its fullest extent."

Working closely with a specialist Braille printer, Chapter created a suite of three cards, each based around a famous Christmas song. A Braille message communicates the song title, while carefully coloured dots provide a visual clue for the able sighted.

In the UK, there are almost 2 million people living with sight loss. The agency hopes that these cards will prompt a thoughtful appreciation of sight loss at a time of year when imagery is such an integral part of the season.

All money raised by the sale of these limited edition cards will be donated to the RNIB, helping to support the blind and visually impaired all year round. Cards are available to buy at www.feelchristmas.com.

Chapter are a full-service marketing communications agency based in Birmingham, England; working with clients including Nissan, Halfords, Jewson, Calor and Whitworths.

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Marketing

UK programmatic ad spend to surpass £3bn in 2017

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How UK programmatic ad spend will rise over the next two years in £bn

By the end of 2017, UK advertisers will have spent £3.39bn on programmatic advertising, up 23.5% compared to last year, according to a new report from eMarketer.

Programmatic spend now represents 79% of all UK digital display ad spend, with this proportion expected to reach 84.5% by 2019. Predictably, mobile continues to be a major growth driver, accounting for 78% of total programmatic digital display ad spend in 2017 – this figure is forecast to climb to 86.5% by 2019.

By comparison, the programmatic numbers for desktop are on the decline. Just 22% of programmatic ad spend, or £743.8m, will be spent on desktop this year, and this figure is expected to fall 13.5% to £609.5m in two years’ time.

By 2019, the total UK spend on programmatic advertising is expected to more than doubled from £1.99bn in 2015 to a much larger £4.52bn. But despite programmatic’s meteoric rise, not everybody remains convinced.

Marketing Week columnist Mark Ritson has linked the rise in programmatic with brand safety issues at the likes of YouTube. And speaking at this year’s Festival of Marketing, Lidl’s head of media Sam Gaunt said the marketing industry is “guilty of overselling programmatic”.

“For all the debate around fraud and viewability, the reality is programmatic is very expensive,” he said. “It’s a premium media. When you stack up the cost of it with traditional media and then weigh up the impacts, it can be hard to justify. You also have no idea where your advertising will end up.”

However, eMarketer’s senior analyst Fisher insists the marketing industry is making positive strides to win back trust from advertisers. He concludes: “The programmatic ecosystem is growing because it’s maturing.

“This maturation is leading to better practices, better behaviour and better transparency. Making everybody in the chain accountable is the next step in cleaning up programmatic’s image further and helping spend rise further.”

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Pro skier Julian Carr crowdfunding Super Bowl ad to raise global warming awareness

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Pro skier and entrepreneur Julian Carr has launched a crowdfunding campaign on Kickstarter in hopes of raising the $5.5m needed to buy 30 seconds of air time during Super Bowl LII.

Carr, who is an ambassador for nonprofits Protect Our Winters and the Climate Reality Project, plans to air an ad about global warming if he raises the necessary funds. He’s tapped San Francisco’s Goodby Silverstein & Partners to help him produce the spot, which has agreed to create it pro bono.

According to GS&P, Carr was inspired to create the ad after President Trump announced his plans to withdraw the US from the Paris climate agreement, which aims to prevent global temperatures from rising more than two degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels.

“America is the biggest polluter in history. Yet only one in eight Americans know there’s a consensus among the scientific community that global warming is caused by humans,” said Carr in a statement. “Together, we can raise awareness in front of 110 million Americans about global warming and let our people know what’s at stake. Because only when we acknowledge the problem can we truly fight it.”

His Kickstarter page says that those who contribute are paying not just for a "large audience," but for "silent focus."

"We are paying for silent focus: Tens of millions of people quietly watching Super Bowl commercials and actually talking about their favorite moments of corporate branding," the page states. "We are paying for exposure: Super Bowl ads are watched and re-watched – on Twitter, on Facebook, on YouTube, and on next-day rankings and analyses across the internet."

The page also states that the project will only be funded if Carr raises the $5.5m by Dec. 22. He plans to spend $5.2m on the production of the commercial, leaving the remaining $300,000 for Kickstarter fees.

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Google’s new custom intent audiences and you

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In mid-November, pre-empting the hellish holiday shopping season, Google unveiled a slew of new features designed to help advertisers maximize their AdWords budgets. While promotion extensions and ad variations are neat and all, the thing I’m most stoked about is the new custom intent audiences feature on Google Display Network (GDN).

If you haven’t checked out Ginny Marvin’s quick summary of what they are (linked above), here’s the gist: Custom intent audiences offer advertisers the opportunity to use the GDN to find “people who want to buy the specific products you offer — based on data from your campaigns, website and YouTube channel.” They come in two distinct flavors:

  • Create-your-own. Like a trip to your favorite pizza chain (but for the GDN), you can mash topics and URLs together like mushrooms and pepperoni in order to target net-new prospects who are probably into your product or service.

[Read the full article on Search Engine Land.]

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